Author Archives: Allan Armitage

About Allan Armitage

Allan Armitage was a professor in the Department of Horticulture at the University of Georgia for 30 years. He recently retired and remains an active consultant, author and lecturer.

Dig A $10 Hole For A 10¢ Plant [opinion]

I know I am not really becoming older, and I know I am certainly not growing wiser. Yet every now and then I learn that something I’ve said in the past has taken root in the minds of many people, and it reappears in the most extraordinary ways. I often tell my students that what

Penstemons Merit More Attention

In the Trial Gardens at the University of Georgia, we look at dozens of echinaceas, heucheras, hibiscus, iris and most of the popular genera. For good reason, that is what people are buying — and any data is good data. However, we also evaluate lesser-known genera such as pulmonaria, drimiopsis, silene and penstemon. The latter

California Spring Trials 2013: Allan Armitage On Up-And-Coming Crops

GreenexAlthough the market for kalanchoes is challenging, it is good to know that for those who wish to grow them, there are some excellent choices.  I was blown away with the diversity of flower size and color of the kalanchoes at Greenex. I especially loved the double flowered series (RoseFlowers), and especially fell in love

6 Things Every Gardener Wants In Plant Varieties (opinion)

Spring has sprung in most areas of the country, and hopefully, landscapers, gardeners and retailers have a little more spring in their step. But even though the season is bringing in much-appreciated orders and cash, it’s important to remember to provide customers with plants suited to their needs. The Cultivar Is King, But Not To 

The National Plant Trialing Program Puts All The Plants In One Basket

How many times have you discussed great ideas — ideas that make sense, ideas that would benefit your company or others — but don’t quite get around to using them? Time, money and distractions all conspire to derail idea implementation until finally, with sufficient prodding and poking, the idea begins to take shape. The idea,