Burpee CEO Praises First Lady’s Efforts

Burpee CEO Praises First Lady's Efforts

 

“Michelle Obama is setting a superb example for our country’s citizens, particularly for America’s children,” says Burpee chairman and CEO, George Ball.

With the “first sizable vegetable garden since Franklin Roosevelt was in office,” Ball says that the implementation of this garden is extremely timely in helping raise awareness about the benefits of homegrown food. He compares it to the physical fitness intiative President John F. Kennedy led.

“It is the kind of program that should please people across the political spectrum. It is inexpensive to implement, and the return on investment is extraordinary,” says Ball.

He continues, “Gardens inspire the kind of optimism the American public is craving right now. Children growing up during this renaissance in vegetable gardening will learn valuable lessons about nutrition, nature, self-efficiency and respecting the earth by gardening alongside their parents.”

To read more about the Burpee Chairman’s views on the White House vegetable garden and vegetable gardening in general, click here.

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2 comments on “Burpee CEO Praises First Lady’s Efforts

  1. Anonymous

    While I applaud the First Lady’s desire to get first hand knowledge of agriculture, some of the press I’ve read implies that organic farming is better than conventional farming. I’ve even read some mainstream media articles that use the terms “organic” and “sustainable” interchangably. I’d agressively challenge that supposition. While all panies are flowers, not all flowers are pansies, so to speak. Conventional pest management practices, when conducted responsibly, play an important role in sustainable agriculture. Being part of the organic movement may be sexier for someone trying to endear themselves to the mainstream media, but organic and conventional farming are not mutually exclusive. To imply otherwise is simply misleading.

  2. Anonymous

    While I applaud the First Lady’s desire to get first hand knowledge of agriculture, some of the press I’ve read implies that organic farming is better than conventional farming. I’ve even read some mainstream media articles that use the terms “organic” and “sustainable” interchangably. I’d agressively challenge that supposition. While all panies are flowers, not all flowers are pansies, so to speak. Conventional pest management practices, when conducted responsibly, play an important role in sustainable agriculture. Being part of the organic movement may be sexier for someone trying to endear themselves to the mainstream media, but organic and conventional farming are not mutually exclusive. To imply otherwise is simply misleading.