Perspective: Matt Stuppy, President, National Greenhouse Manufacturers Association

Matt Stuppy may be young but he brings a long-term perspective to the greenhouse industry as fifth-generation owner and president of Stuppy Greenhouse Manufacturing in North Kansas City, Mo. He’s also the current president of the National Greenhouse Manufacturers Association (NGMA), which brings the structures, equipment and environmental controls segments together. As an agricultural engineer, he has been actively involved in NGMA’s codes and standards committee, which is currently addressing new codes related to energy consumption.

GG: How is the business you are running today different than the one your father or grandfather led?

MS: The business has been changing ever since it was started in 1873. That’s probably the biggest lesson I’ve learned from our family history. Fortunately, we have had the foresight to change with the industry. We’ve gone from a rose grower to a wholesale florist to a greenhouse design and construction company. The fact that we’ve stayed in horticulture the whole time is important to me. I like that we’ve put our roots in horticulture and found different ways to be a successful part of the industry.

Since I’ve started as president of Stuppy, we have put more energy into greenhouse construction and design. We were an established greenhouse manufacturer and needed to add construction capabilities to offer our customers a complete package. While growers may have people on staff who are capable of building and maintaining greenhouses, our educational and research customers usually do not.

GG: How would you characterize the state of the industry as it relates to greenhouse structures? It seems growers who are vendors for the box stores are growing but the rest of the industry is stagnant.

MS: Certain segments have slowed down but there’s still a market there. We’ve been busy. In the 1970s and ’80s, we saw an explosion in the bedding plant industry. Back then, if you could bend a piece of steel, you were a greenhouse manufacturer. While that explosion may not be there now, we have a multibillion dollar industry and structures are part of that.

The commercial floriculture market has changed and is still changing. Ultimately, it’s about what consumers want and where they perceive value and spend money. Have the box stores influenced it? Absolutely. Box stores have changed where you buy a hammer and where you buy a petunia. So we have seen growers react and grow with this channel.

Breeders and seed companies have been influential, too. There are still opportunities for all types and sizes of growers. Recent trends toward locally grown flowers and produce show smaller growers can still be successful. It’s about running a business successfully. There are fewer growers today than 10 years ago, but it’s not doom and gloom for any type of grower. Those who are successful, identify market shifts and plan accordingly. Those who are not, hold on and hope things will be like yesterday.

GG: Are you seeing more growers improving the facilities they have? What kinds of retrofits are being done?

MS: Since we tend to focus on new construction, I personally do not see a lot of retrofit. Our projects tend to be more extensive and are centered on adding space and/or recovering a greenhouse. Obvious places to improve existing facilities involve equipment to improve energy efficiency and turn a crop faster. Anything that helps growers save money and operating costs, they can get a payback on or turn a crop faster, is what they’ll spend money on.

GG: We’ve heard that if you have the funds and market-driven reasons to build, now is the time to take advantage of lower interest rates and competitive pricing.

MS: It’s always a good time to build. Ultimately, construction tends to be more a function of grower success than anything else. As growers successfully create new business, they need to expand facilities. Nobody is going to build something they don’t need. While interest rates may be low, steel, aluminum and plastic prices have risen over the last six months. We’re not exempt from inflation and the cost of materials. Usually, growers see this, too, because they need to buy other consumables, like plastic pots and trays. They see what’s happening in raw materials.

GG: What kinds of things has NGMA been working on to support the industry?

MS: NGMA is working on some new energy code guidelines and standards. Building codes are starting to include energy consumption and “green” concepts. It is important that our industry is represented so we can continue to grow and deliver great plants to people. The last thing we’d want is for greenhouses to become illegal because they are made of plastic, glass and steel. A greenhouse is a unique building for a unique purpose and we want to make sure that’s recognized.

GG: What has NGMA done in the past to help greenhouse growers and structures manufacturers?

MS: The most important things we have done revolve around building codes and standards. It isn’t the most exciting thing to talk about and is often overlooked and undervalued by growers. It would be much harder to build greenhouses than it is today without past work by NGMA members.

NGMA also has put together great information that is frequently used by growers and other horticultural professionals in the form of standards, guides and helpful hints. Our Helpful Hint series is quite informative and can be a benefit to established growers and new prospective growers. They help generate ideas, best practices and can be great tools for training people.

GG: Your annual meeting will be in conjunction with the North American Horticultural Suppliers Association (NAHSA) in St. Louis. How has NGMA been working with other industry organizations?

MS: NGMA realizes it is part of a larger industry. We are always open to providing our expertise and energy to good projects. The joint meeting is another example of that spirit of cooperation. There are some companies that belong to both organizations. This is a good opportunity to recognize we have some common ground and provide a forum for sharing ideas and goals.

GG: Are there any particular goals you’ve had as president of NGMA? What’s next for the organization?

MS: My main goal is seeing that we finish the energy code project. It’s relevant and timely to today’s building and construction environment. I think it accomplishes our purpose of helping growers and uniquely represents the industry. You’re not going to see private companies do that, or American Nursery & Landscape Association speak to that or a growers cooperative make an impact on building codes. The NGMA membership works hard to do some very specific things for the industry. Those benefits are intended to help growers.

Leave a Reply

More From State of the Industry...
State of the industry 2016

February 23, 2016

Download Greenhouse Grower’s 2016 State Of The Industry Whitepaper

A year of growth in 2015 also had its share of challenges, and as a result, growers and suppliers were a bit more guarded going into 2016. After a few years of extreme weather and drought, a massive ongoing labor shortage, a shaky economy, and increased government regulation, Greenhouse Grower’s 2016 State Of The Industry Survey shows growers and retailers are moving forward with cautious optimism. Despite their many concerns, growers are ready to tackle another spring season in 2016, and many have reported that investments they have made within the past year are helping to drive their operations into the future. Further, rising consumer confidence indicates good things for 2016, growers said. Greenhouse Grower‘s 2016 State Of The Industry Whitepaper includes all the results of the survey, including comparisons of 2015 sales to past years, details on how 2016 production volume and prices will compare to 2015, crops that […]

Read More

February 18, 2016

Poinsettia Survey Shows Strong Sales For Greenhouse Growers In 2015

The year 2015 might have been one that many were glad to see in the rear view mirror, but for poinsettia growers, it was a good sales year — perhaps the strongest in quite a while. Compared to 2014, which was also widely deemed a success among growers for its seasonal cold at just the right time, good weather for shipping, and a good holiday spirit, the 2015 season was solid for a number of reasons. The weather, a rebounding economy, and increased demand all contributed to what growers said was a “very strong” sales season. “It was a strong year beginning to end due to great weather and quality product as the market demanded,” said Dan Chaney of Ivy Acres, in Greenhouse Grower’s 2015 Poinsettia Survey.     “Sales were strong. Demand was better than the previous two years,” said Larry Windham of Windham Greenhouses Inc. “Very good. The […]

Read More
Pot Mum Combos (Syngenta Flowers)

February 8, 2016

Syngenta Has A New Buyer, Will Not Divest Flower Seeds Business

Syngenta has announced that it will likely approve an offer from ChemChina to acquire the company, which means it no longer plans to divest its flower seed business.

Read More
Latest Stories
State of the industry 2016

February 23, 2016

Download Greenhouse Grower’s 2016 State Of The Industry…

A year of growth in 2015 also had its share of challenges, and as a result, growers and suppliers were a bit more guarded going into 2016. After a few years of extreme weather and drought, a massive ongoing labor shortage, a shaky economy, and increased government regulation, Greenhouse Grower’s 2016 State Of The Industry Survey shows growers and retailers are moving forward with cautious optimism. Despite their many concerns, growers are ready to tackle another spring season in 2016, and many have reported that investments they have made within the past year are helping to drive their operations into the future. Further, rising consumer confidence indicates good things for 2016, growers said. Greenhouse Grower‘s 2016 State Of The Industry Whitepaper includes all the results of the survey, including comparisons of 2015 sales to past years, details on how 2016 production volume and prices will compare to 2015, crops that […]

Read More

February 18, 2016

Poinsettia Survey Shows Strong Sales For Greenhouse Gro…

The year 2015 might have been one that many were glad to see in the rear view mirror, but for poinsettia growers, it was a good sales year — perhaps the strongest in quite a while. Compared to 2014, which was also widely deemed a success among growers for its seasonal cold at just the right time, good weather for shipping, and a good holiday spirit, the 2015 season was solid for a number of reasons. The weather, a rebounding economy, and increased demand all contributed to what growers said was a “very strong” sales season. “It was a strong year beginning to end due to great weather and quality product as the market demanded,” said Dan Chaney of Ivy Acres, in Greenhouse Grower’s 2015 Poinsettia Survey.     “Sales were strong. Demand was better than the previous two years,” said Larry Windham of Windham Greenhouses Inc. “Very good. The […]

Read More
Pot Mum Combos (Syngenta Flowers)

February 8, 2016

Syngenta Has A New Buyer, Will Not Divest Flower Seeds …

Syngenta has announced that it will likely approve an offer from ChemChina to acquire the company, which means it no longer plans to divest its flower seed business.

Read More
State of the industry 2016

January 21, 2016

Green Industry Is Set For Continued Growth In 2016

Economist Charlie Hall says the outlook for the green industry is promising despite the havoc wreaked on plant sales by the downturn in housing.

Read More
How will growers' production in 2016 compare to 2015

January 18, 2016

2016 State Of The Greenhouse Industry Numbers At A Glan…

Greenhouse Grower‘s 2016 State Of The Industry Survey shows some promising trends for the new year. Here’s a look at the greenhouse market for 2016, in graphics.     For a more in-depth analysis of where the industry stands, read Greenhouse Grower‘s 2016 State Of The Industry article, “Growers And Suppliers Move Forward With Cautious Optimism In 2016.”

Read More
Top Concerns sidebar

January 18, 2016

Growers And Suppliers Move Forward With Cautious Optimi…

A year of growth in 2015 also had its share of challenges, and as a result, growers and suppliers are a bit more guarded going into 2016. After a few years of extreme weather and drought, a massive ongoing labor shortage, a shaky economy, and increased government regulation, Greenhouse Grower’s 2016 State Of The Industry Survey shows growers and retailers are moving forward with cautious optimism. Greenhouse Grower’s 2016 State Of The Industry Survey included separate questions for growers and for suppliers. Of our 358 respondents, 103 were suppliers, 111 were grower-retailers, 109 were wholesale growers, and 35 were young plant growers. Among growers, 57% indicated their operations were small (less than 100,000 square feet), 21% were medium-sized (100,000 to 399,999 square feet), and 22% said they were large growers (400,000 square feet or larger). Sixty-eight percent of the grower respondents said their sales grew in 2015 over 2014, down […]

Read More
State of the industry 2016

January 14, 2016

Craig Regelbrugge Says 2016 Will Be A Year Of Waiting F…

The 2016 presidential election will make for slow progress on critical regulatory issues like health care, pollinator health, and immigration reform.

Read More

December 29, 2015

The Home Depot Says No To Neonics

The Home Depot plans to phase out neonicotinoids by 2018, according to a recent statement on the company’s website. The large home improvement retailer stated that its live goods suppliers have reduced the number of plants that they treat with neonicotinoids, and now more than 80% of all flowering plants sold at The Home Depot are not treated with neonicotinoids. The retailer said it will continue this decrease unless: Treatment is required by state or federal regulation, or Undisputed science proves that the use of neonicotinoids on live goods does not have a lethal or sub-lethal effect on pollinators Aside from these exceptions, the retailer has implemented a complete phase-out of neonicotinoid use on live goods by the end of 2018. Meanwhile, The Home Depot has required all of its live goods suppliers to label plants that have been treated with neonicotinoids. “The Home Depot is deeply engaged in understanding the […]

Read More
Pollinator-Conference-NC State

December 9, 2015

Pollinator Gardens Are On The Rise, Provide Opportuniti…

Thanks to the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge, enacted in June 2015 by the National Pollinator Garden Network, scores of new pollinator gardens to be planted over the next year and beyond will provide growers with ample opportunities to produce, promote and sell plants that are ideal for pollinator forage and health. And with research underway within the industry, we’ll soon have more knowledge about which plants are the most beneficial and attractive to pollinators. At Bayer’s Bee Care Center, the level of consumer engagement and interest in planting pollinator gardens is very high, Bayer’s Sarah Myers says. Bayer now has 73 local and industry partners and counting in its “Feed A Bee Campaign,” launched in March. Educating consumers about what they can plant to attract bees, and the impact they can have with even the smallest amount of space, is highly important, Myers says. It’s worth explaining to them that […]

Read More
foodscaping at epcot - Foodscaping Goes Big At Disney

December 9, 2015

Foodscaping Challenges Conventional Ideas About Landsca…

Conventional ideas about what a landscape should look like are being challenged left and right, from young homeowners like Sarah Baker of Baker’s Acres, who are standing up for their right not to mow their lawns, to Brie Arthur’s passion to start a movement to incorporate food with flowers throughout suburban and urban landscapes nationwide. As younger generations step up as consumers and industry leaders, these changes are likely to continue, and the horticulture industry, which has the most to gain, would be remiss not to embrace and influence them. Well known for her personal foodscape, which she has promoted across social media, and her annual tomato-tasting fundraising event benefiting the nearby J.C. Raulston Arboretum in Raleigh, N.C., Brie Arthur has also been working with schools and her local Homeowner Association (HOA) to challenge the traditional idea of the landscape to one that incorporates the growing of food with mainstream, […]

Read More

November 20, 2015

Lessons Learned From The California Drought

For those of us who live in the areas of the country that experienced harsh winters and significant rain over the past three seasons, water has become a nuisance in some cases, rather than a blessing. I can’t count the number of times I have wished to be able to send the snow or the rain to the West Coast, tied up with a big red bow. But think about how we’d feel if we didn’t have the snow and the rain, and we were experiencing the same dry conditions that the residents of California, Oregon and Washington have. With fresh water supplies dwindling in regions of the world, and the resistance of residents in states like Michigan to share water from the Great Lakes, it’s likely that the next civil or world war could be fought over our most precious resource. California’s epic drought should cause everyone to look […]

Read More
Kate Santos Operations Director Dummen Orange

November 18, 2015

Kate Santos Presents New Opportunities For The Horticul…

Dr. Kate Santos is a scientist, an artist, an advocate, a traveler, a dreamer, a visionary and a go-getter. Well-known for her work managing Dümmen Orange as Operations Director, Santos has taken on a new role as co-founder of Luxflora, an organization for women in horticulture.

Read More
MPS Sustainable Quality Logo

November 17, 2015

International Seminar Finds Broad-Based Need For Indust…

Achieving durability and maximum transparency is the responsibility of the entire floriculture supply chain, was the main conclusion of the seminar “Shaping the Future of Floriculture,” which took place on Monday 9 November on the S.S. Rotterdam in The Netherlands. With just under 300 participants, the seminar, organized by Union Fleurs, VGB and MPS, received plenty of attention.

Read More
Greenhouse Grower State of the Industry

November 11, 2015

Greenhouse Grower’s 2016 State of The In…

The State of the Industry report, which uses input from both growers and suppliers, is designed to help you understand this year's crop and sales trends, as well as the issues that keep you up at night.

Read More

November 11, 2015

Drought Has Triggered A New Normal For The California L…

California is now entering its fifth year of the worst drought in 500 years, with no end in sight. Weather experts predict the current drought will continue into 2016, despite optimistic projections of increased rain patterns this winter caused by a strong El Niño ocean current. Residents have fully bought in to the emergency, and embraced Governor Jerry Brown’s April 1 mandate to reduce water usage by 25 percent. Even after an above-average hot summer, the state has exceeded its goal, with a per-month average of 28 percent water reduction. Some of the ways homeowners are being encouraged to reduce their outdoor water use are concerning, but the good news is, drought-tolerant landscaping and awareness of water-wise gardening is on the rise. Cash For Grass Rebates Have Landowners Trading In Their Lawns When Governor Brown’s water reduction mandate was announced in April, consumer reaction was reflected in the sales at […]

Read More

November 3, 2015

Two Floral Industry Leaders Die

Katharyn Elizabeth “Betsy” Demaree, 77, of Syndicate Sales, Inc. passed away on October 26, and Yoshimi "Shimi" Shibata, 100, formerly president of Mt. Eden Floral Company, passed away on October 31.

Read More
Charlie Hall

October 26, 2015

Charlie Hall Says Landscaping Services Are Trending Up,…

Everyone listens to Dr. Charlie Hall, professor and Ellison Chair in International Horticulture, in the Department of Horticultural Sciences at Texas A&M University. And at his Cultivate’15 session, “The Future Value of the Landscape Services Sector,” attendees hung on his every word. According to First Research, the output of the U.S. landscaping industry is forecasted to grow at a compounded rate of 4 percent through 2016, indicating steady growth in the long term. In the landscape sector, regional firms are rapidly scaling up to achieve the economies of scale necessary to compete with the very large firms. Here are some of the points Hall made at the session where he projected his near-term forecast for the landscape sector: With 1.1 million housing starts now, the net demand is 1.5 million, and economists project there will be 1.2 million by the end of the year. That means, construction is behind in […]

Read More
cannabis

October 23, 2015

Consider Your Options With Greenhouse Cannabis Producti…

I’ve been thinking a lot about Cannabis. But wait, there’s more! All jokes aside, Cannabis is certainly a crop that comes fraught with controversy. Over the past few months, while we have been learning and reporting about the federal legality issues, financial risks and considerations and even the work and expense that goes into the application process to obtain a license to produce this crop, we have tried to remain as objective as possible. We’re not advocating that you produce Cannabis, nor are we opposing your choice to consider this crop as a future direction for your operation. Our goal in publishing eNewsletters and the print report found in the pages of the October issue of Greenhouse Grower, is simply to inform you of what production of this crop would include, from the challenges and risks to the opportunities. And no matter how you feel about the issue, as a business […]

Read More
[gravityform id="35" title="false" description="false"]