A Growing Medium To Consider

A Growing Medium To Consider

Densu Ventures Inc. has redesigned its website to share new sales information for growers, landscapers and retailers to highlight two research studies conducted by students and faculty at the University of Florida.

You can check out the redesigned site here.

The two most significant finds of the study on Densu Coir are its capability for holding water and that it’s more forgiving than other substrates when plants are over fertilized.

According to the study, Densu Coir can absorb six to eight times its weight in water. Densu Coir can be hydrophilic when initially purchased with moisture content at 15 to 25 percent as observed by researchers at Jiffy. It takes up to 60 hours for Densu Coir to attain its maximum water holding capabilities.

At that capability, Densu Coir still maintains porosity at 20 to 28 percent. Growing tests by New Style Gardening, an organic greenhouse operator in Burlington, Ontario, show cuttings grown in Densu Coir have two to three times more root growth than cutting planted in a premium peat moss mix.

The second unique Densu Coir find–that it’s more forgiving that other substrates–was discovered purely by accident when the University of Florida observed that at a feeding rate of 10 pounds of fertilizer per acre, plants grown in Densu Coir increased in dry weight by 12.5 percent when compared to plants grown in Densu Coir with six pounds of fertilizer per acre.

When the same experiments were performed with plants grown in premium potting soil mix, the plants grown in 10 pounds of fertilizer did not survive. When the experiments were repeated, the result turned out to be the same.

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2 comments on “A Growing Medium To Consider

  1. Anonymous

    I grow tropical plants in a low light ( atrium) setting. Does anyone have experience growing torpicals long term in coir? It makes sense that they would do well being from similar geographic areas.

  2. Anonymous

    I grow tropical plants in a low light ( atrium) setting. Does anyone have experience growing torpicals long term in coir? It makes sense that they would do well being from similar geographic areas.