Luxflora Paris Trip Offers Insights on Trends Shaping Horticulture

Luxflora Paris Trip Offers Insights on Trends Shaping Horticulture

Luxflora Paris TripEach year, Luxflora hosts an international trip that allows participants to gain insights on trends and gather inspiration that ultimately will shape and support our industry in many ways. This year’s event led us to Maison & Objet and Design Week in the City of Lights – Paris, France.

Luxflora is a woman-led, non-profit organization focused on building a network for women in the floriculture industry to connect, interact, and ultimately inspire one another toward promoting the prevalence of flowers in everyday life.

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The annual trip is a foundational event in which Luxflora cultivates its goals for its board of directors and members to create, inspire, and flourish by witnessing firsthand what others in our international community are doing to promote plants, as well as to gather ideas from industries that interact with ours, such as art, fashion, gastronomy, and architecture . During our international travels, we keep an intense schedule focused on a clear mission to collect as much information as possible on emerging trends and inspirations in many different areas, in order to translate these ideas that resonate with consumers to the floriculture industry. With an eye toward the cutting edge of design and consumer-biased trends, Luxflora will develop a Trend Report that we hope will guide the floriculture industry on how to apply next-level thinking to areas in floriculture such as plant and variety selection, and developing marketing and promotion of our products so they are inherent to the consumer’s daily lifestyle.

Paris is a major European city and a global cultural center . Wide boulevards and the River Seine crisscross the Paris cityscape. Beyond such landmarks as the Eiffel Tower and the gothic, 12th century Notre-Dame cathedral, the city is known for its design and avant-garde culture. It is no wonder that women within our industry would be attracted to such a city.

We spent two days at Maison & Objet walking the trade event and attending sessions to experience first-hand evolving consumer trends, inspiring experiences, and brand offerings. The event included three major sections: Maison is interior decoration; Objet is concept and retail, and the third section encompasses luxury, design, and architecture.

Our travels continued with Paris Design Week, an event involving more than 300 storefront businesses across Paris. Specialty retailers, galleries, hotels, and restaurants were open for a week to showcase their dedication to design, fashion, and forward-thinking trends. Highlights from our road show were Lalique Crystal, Yves Rocher Botanical Cosmetic Company, and SICIS, a beautiful mosaic art factory.

While walking the streets of Paris, we visited a Parisian retail garden center and a floral design shop — Jardinerie Truffaut and Au Nom de la Rose, which means “in the name of the rose.’ Here we found true inspiration on unique and revolutionary ways to design and display flowers at retail.

The final day of the excursion took us outside the city of Paris to Giverny, a village of timeless beauty and home to Claude Monet, and the Palace of Versailles. In the flower garden called Clos Normand, we reflected on the week and enjoyed the tranquil Japanese-inspired water gardens. In the afternoon, we toured through the sprawling landscape and museum of the Palace of Versailles. This immense, 18th century palace overlooks 30,000 acres of gardens featuring ofwaterways, working fountains, and statues that encompass over five centuries of history.

Looking outside of your everyday path always will inspire fresh perspectives into our businesses within the industry. The ideas we garnered and the conversations shared on the Luxflora trip will ultimatelygenerate new-found solutions and perspectives for our market. Every trip reveals valuable insights, information, and key influences that can parlay into our everyday lives. This is what we on the Board of Directors call the Luxflora Effect.