Bailey Nurseries To Eliminate Foliar Treatments In Container And Bareroot Fields With Three Neonicotinoid Insecticides

As directed by EPA, the bee hazard icon appears in the Directions For Use for each application site for specific use restrictions and instructions to protect bee and other pollinators.

As directed by EPA, the bee hazard icon appears in the Directions For Use for each application site for specific use restrictions and instructions to protect bees and other pollinators.

Bailey Nurseries says it will eliminate all foliar treatments made with the three named neonicotinoid insecticides – Dinotefuran, Imidacloprid and Thiamethoxam – from container and bareroot fields.

“Foliar applications of any insecticides are now known to be the most harmful to bees, and as a result we are ceasing this practice,” said a statement from the company.

The statement from Bailey said it will follow the new regulations that are being put in place by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

It also includes a summary of the new labeling from EPA on use of neonicotinoids. The new label includes the following wording for food crops and commercially grown ornamentals not under contract for pollination services but are attractive to pollinators:

“Do not apply this product while bees are foraging. Do not apply this product until flowering is complete and all petals have fallen unless one of the following conditions is met:

• The application is made to the target site after sunset

• The application is made to the target site when temperatures are below 55˚F

• The application is made in accordance with a government-initiated public health response

• The application is made in accordance with an active state-administered apiary registry program where beekeepers are notified no less than 48 hours prior to the time of the planned application so that the bees can be removed, covered or otherwise protected prior to spraying

• The application is made due to an imminent threat of significant crop loss, and a documented determination consistent with an IPM plan or predetermined economic threshold is met. Every effort should be made to notify beekeepers no less than 48 hours prior to the time of the planned application so that the bees can be removed, covered or otherwise protected prior to spraying.”

Bailey Nurseries’ statement was accompanied by background information on neonicotinoid insecticides from the company’s Plant Health Manager Jean-Marc Versolato, who has been involved in industry-wide discussions regarding this issue, reviewed related research and is an excellent resource for the horticulture industry.

Registrants of nitroguanidine neonicotinoid products were asked to submit fast-track amendments to revise products labels, incorporating the new labeling as described above by no later than September 30, 2013.

“We must acknowledge our stewardship role in using these chemistries, deploy them as part of a management strategies like Integrated Pest Management or Best Management Practices and always use them only as directed by the EPA-approved label,” the statement from Bailey says.

“This is an ongoing discussion between governmental agencies, researchers, developers and growers, and Bailey Nurseries is committed to working with our industry partners to find a positive resolution. We focus on conducting business in an environmentally responsible manner and are dedicated to making communities a better place for generations to come. Our company takes environmental stewardship very seriously, and we look forward to forthcoming dialogue.”

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