August 15, 2011

Natural Industries Breaks Ground On New Facility

Natural Industries has broken ground on a 20,000 square-foot facility in an office park setting on the north side of Houston that will include a 5,000 square-foot research laboratory. The facility is expected to be completed later this year. “With increasing global demand for our patented microbial products, we have outgrown our lab space,” says Boomer Cardinale, marketing director for Natural Industries. “Our growth has also resulted in a doubling of our staff in just the past year.” Natural Industries’ microbes are currently found in products used by thousands of horticulture, agriculture and landscape professionals around the world. These microbes are proven effective for such plants as annuals, perennials, shrubs, woody ornamentals, trees and landscape transplants. After years of use by commercial operations, Natural Industries then brings its microbe-based products to the consumer lawn and garden market. For more information, visit NaturalIndustries.com.

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June 20, 2011

Adorn Now Available For Use In New York

Valent Professional Products’ Adorn fungicide has been registered by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for control of downy mildew, phytophthora, pythium and other diseases in New York for greenhouse and nursery ornamental production. Available for use as a spray or drench, Adorn is an addition to fungicide rotations and plays a key role in resistance management programs. “Adorn is the only chemistry in its class, so there are no resistance issues and no cross-resistance issues,” says Jill Calabro, regional field development manager and plant pathologist for Valent. “That provides a huge benefit for New York growers who find themselves in need of additional options in the fight against disease and in resistance management.” Researchers working with Adorn are seeing that it performs well against some of the most important diseases facing growers today, including downy mildew, phytophthora and pythium. Margery Daughtrey, senior Extension associate in the Department of Plant Pathology […]

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June 9, 2011

New Biological Fungicide: Subtilex NG

Becker Underwood’s new Subtilex NG is based on the MBI 600 strain of Bacillus subtilis, which produces an endospore allowing bacteria to survive extreme environmental conditions like heat and desiccation. Subtilex NG works through two modes of action: It colonizes plant roots to exclude soil-borne pathogens, and it produces a metabolite that destroys the pathogen’s cell wall. “Unlike a number of other biological products on the market, Subtilex NG offers growers a more flexible application window and also doesn’t require special storage or refrigeration,” says Joe Lara, product manager at Becker Underwood. “Subtilex NG has a long shelf life and complements a wide variety of chemical and biological products used in integrated pest management programs. “The unique dual mode of action helps produce high-quality crops that are more vigorous, look healthier and ultimately add value to the grower’s product brand.”  Visit Becker Underwood online at BeckerUnderwood.com to find out more about Subtilex […]

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May 27, 2011

New Orchid ImmunoStrip With Expanded Potexvirus Detection

Agdia has introduced an improved orchid pathogen test that detects and identifies a newly discovered Asian isolate of the potexvirus Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV). Designed to rapidly screen all types of orchids for stains of both CymMV and Odontoglossum ringspot virus (ORSV), the Orchid Virus ImmunoStrip allows fast, user-friendly screening of symptomatic, as well as non-symptomatic plants. The Orchid Virus ImmunoStrip is ideal for screening cultivated orchids for these prevalent and problematic pathogens prior to purchase. The test is easy to perform, requires no special test equipment or facilites and provides results in as little as five minutes. For more information, visit the company’s website at www.agdia.com, email info@agdia.com or phone at 574-264-2615.

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February 11, 2011

Companion Fungicide Receives California Registration

Companion liquid biological fungicide recently received registration in California for turfgrass and landscape use. Manufactured by Growth Products, Companion effectively prevents, controls and suppresses a broad range of root and foliar diseases, including pythium and phytophthora. Companion, the first first EPA-approved biofungicide, contains the powerful but environmentally friendly GB03 strain of Bacillus subtilis, which prevents and controls plant diseases through multiple modes of action. GB03 produces a broad-spectrum antibiotic that disrupts pathogen cell-wall formation, and it stimulates a plant’s natural immune system. A competitive and fast-colonizing rhizobacterium, GB03 also crowds out pathogens to prevent their growth and antagonistic effects. Because Companion is not a chemical fungicide but rather a biological fungicide, pathogens do not develop disease resistance. This makes Companion an ideal component of a disease management program. Companion can be used in rotation with chemical fungicides or can be tank mixed with smaller amounts of chemical fungicides for improved […]

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January 21, 2011

Expanded Label for ZeroTol In California

ZeroTol broad-spectrum algaecide/fungicide has an updated label in California. The expanded label includes new applications for treatment of hard surfaces and greenhouse tools and equipment to prevent the spread of algal and fungal growth. In addition, ZeroTol is now labeled to treat several new organisms, including black spot, downy and powdery mildew, leaf spot, pseudomonas and xanthomonas, among others. With these new updates, the full ZeroTol label is now available to California growers. For more information about ZeroTol, contact BioSafe Systems at 1-888-273-3088 or visit the company online at BioSafeSystems.com.

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December 13, 2010

OHP Unveils Disarm O Fungicide

OHP‘s Disarm O is a broad-spectrum foliar and drench systemic fungicide that offers control of many troublesome foliar diseases, as well as soil-borne diseases like rhizoctonia and phytophthora. Among the foliar diseases controlled by Disarm O are anthracnose, powdery mildew, rusts and leaf spots. Disarm O may be used on plants growing in containers, benches, flats, plugs and beds in greenhouses, shadehouses, nurseries and interiorscapes. Rigorous testing has shown excellent plant safety. Disarm O, a member of the strobilurin class of fungicides. “Most strobilurins are strongest as foliar disease control products,” says Jeff Dobbs, OHP’s technical services director. “Disarm O is not only strong as a foliar disease control product but also offers control of soil-borne diseases.” OHP will continue to add additional soil-borne diseases to the Disarm O specimen label. “We are proud to bring yet another winning product to the horticulture market,” says Terry Higgins, OHP vice president […]

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November 30, 2010

When To Light and When To Shade: Ready Research Results

Plants increase in mass, or dry weight, through photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is the process that harvests light energy to drive critical processes resulting in plant growth. Why is increasing photosynthesis important? Increased photosynthesis is associated with increased flowering, increased plant quality and increased post-harvest life. How much, or how fast, a plant can photosynthesize depends on light intensity, carbon dioxide and temperature. Although much work was done during the 1960s and ’70s, there is little recent research on how changing light intensity, carbon dioxide and/or temperature affect photosynthesis of commonly grown greenhouse crops today. For this reason, we started a research project at the University of Minnesota with support from the Floriculture and Nursery Research Initiative and the American Floral Endowment to provide growers with answers to questions such as: How much supplemental light should I add to maximize photosynthesis? What is the impact on photosynthesis of adding supplemental carbon dioxide? […]

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November 30, 2010

Rotate Or Tank Mix To Avoid Resistance

In this, the final article in our series on making the most of your fungicide dollars, I am considering fungicide resistance management. There are some key topics that should be addressed, and I am covering them by answering questions. Obviously, if your fungicide fails due to resistance, your dollars are wasted. Which pathogens become resistant the quickest? The pathogens that become resistant to fungicides most quickly are those that reproduce quickly and in high numbers. These include powdery mildew fungi (e.g. Oidium), downy mildew fungi (e.g. Peronospora), Botrytis, Pythium, Phytophthora and bacteria (e.g. Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas, Erwinia, etc.). It is interesting that although bacteria develop resistance to copper quite readily, fungi don’t seem to. The FRAC (Fungicide Resistance Action Committee) actually has copper listed as low risk of resistance development. Which fungicides are most likely to have resistance concerns? In this case, the more narrow the mode of action the more […]

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August 23, 2010

Getting The Most From Your Fungicides: Application Rate, Interval & Timing

I am sure you’re thinking the headline is somewhat dull, but if you do not pay attention to these aspects of disease control, you will be wasting a lot of money and wind up irritated. This article is part of the series to make the most of your fungicide/bactericide dollars in order to keep your profit margin up. I hope the thoughts I pass on will help some of you make better, more cost-effective decisions regarding fungicide/bactericide use. Does Rate Really Matter? I always ask which rates are being used to treat a disease before I try to suggest a control strategy. It is interesting to me how often the rates being used are too low to be effective. You might as well be spraying water if you use too low a rate. Remember, water is not neutral but something fungi and bacteria thrive on. So spraying very low rates […]

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August 23, 2010

Krause Joins BioWorks Product Development Team

Matthew Krause has joined the BioWorks product development team. Krause, a native of Ohio, is a three-time graduate of Ohio State University, where he gained his multiple degrees. He holds a bachelor’s in ag business and applied economics, along with a Masters in plant pathology. For the past nine years Krause has resided in Belgium and worked as a senior plant pathologist. He has also worked as an associate research leader in the Microbial Process Ecology and Management Program at the KU Leuven University College De Nayer Institute. As the product development specialist at BioWorks, Krause will work to develop emerging technologies into new products, implement commercialization efforts to support the launching of new products and maintain existing products in the market.

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