August 23, 2010

Krause Joins BioWorks Product Development Team

Matthew Krause has joined the BioWorks product development team. Krause, a native of Ohio, is a three-time graduate of Ohio State University, where he gained his multiple degrees. He holds a bachelor’s in ag business and applied economics, along with a Masters in plant pathology. For the past nine years Krause has resided in Belgium and worked as a senior plant pathologist. He has also worked as an associate research leader in the Microbial Process Ecology and Management Program at the KU Leuven University College De Nayer Institute. As the product development specialist at BioWorks, Krause will work to develop emerging technologies into new products, implement commercialization efforts to support the launching of new products and maintain existing products in the market.

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August 23, 2010

Getting The Most From Your Fungicides: Application Rate, Interval & Timing

I am sure you’re thinking the headline is somewhat dull, but if you do not pay attention to these aspects of disease control, you will be wasting a lot of money and wind up irritated. This article is part of the series to make the most of your fungicide/bactericide dollars in order to keep your profit margin up. I hope the thoughts I pass on will help some of you make better, more cost-effective decisions regarding fungicide/bactericide use. Does Rate Really Matter? I always ask which rates are being used to treat a disease before I try to suggest a control strategy. It is interesting to me how often the rates being used are too low to be effective. You might as well be spraying water if you use too low a rate. Remember, water is not neutral but something fungi and bacteria thrive on. So spraying very low rates […]

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July 30, 2010

Benchpress Q&A: Jan Buberl

BASF hosted a media summit June 8-10 to discuss sustainability as a grounded approach for growers. At the summit, Greenhouse Grower caught up with Jan Buberl, director of specialty products at BASF, who outlined the chemical company’s sustainability initiatives. Q What factors is BASF taking into account to determine which products are sustainable and which are not? A To determine whether a product is sustainable or not, you have to put that product into the whole context of the production system. Take the example of a greenhouse: A lot of different factors enter the equation. (BASF’s) Eco-Efficiency Analysis system analyzes the full footprint of the value chain, from the production of the active ingredient to the final outcome of the product. We take a lot of different aspects of conservation into account–the use of water, energy and land–to determine the eco-efficiency of our products. Q Is it the supplier’s role […]

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July 19, 2010

MSU Diagnostic Services Offering Free Late Blight Testing

Late blight disease in tomatoes and potatoes could become a problem this summer, so Michigan State University (MSU) Diagnostic Services is offering free late blight testing to Michigan home gardeners and commercial growers. Free testing will also be available in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) tent from 10 a.m. to noon during Ag Expo, MSU’s outdoor farm show, July 20-22, on Mt. Hope Road in East Lansing. Because a cool, wet spring has made widespread development of the disease possible in the state this year, growers should become familiar with the symptoms of late blight and other common tomato and potato diseases, according to Jan Byrne, plant pathologist and diagnostician at Diagnostic Services. “The late blight pathogen can infect both stems and foliage of tomatoes and potatoes,” she says. “The first symptoms are dark green, water-soaked areas. These areas quickly turn dark brown and the plant tissue […]

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June 22, 2010

Getting The Most From Your Fungicides Part 3: Diagnosis & Application

Are you still guessing which products to use on a disease? Are you even sure you are treating diseases and not environmental, nutritional or even phytotoxicity look-a-likes? I have spent years trying to convince growers they can actually save money if they work with a lab to make sure what they think is a disease and which one it is. In this article I will, hopefully, get you to think more about using a rifle approach to disease control and not the popular shotgun approach. It can save you a lot of money if you use only the best product for the actual problem at hand. Getting Started The first step is always to know what the actual problem is. A lab diagnosis is the best way to determine the problem you are facing. This must be done before the fungicide program is chosen. This time, I will attempt to […]

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June 21, 2010

Late Blight Makes An Appearance

Tom Ford, a Penn State Cooperative Extension agent covering Cambria and Somerset counties in Pennsylvania, responded to a call at a community garden in Blair County earlier this month. According to the Tribune-Democrat, Ford confirmed 50 to 75 tomato plants were infected with late blight. “I am actually very worried at this point,” Ford told the Tribune-Democrat. “If it gets warm and dry we may be OK, but these little cold fronts are especially bad for Cambria and Somerset because of the mountain areas. “It’s just a matter of time before we see more.” Late blight-infected plants were traced to a retail greenhouse in Somerset County, creating concern that many gardeners in Cambria County may have some of the infected plants, Ford says. Penn State officials are not identifying the Somerset business that sold the infected plants. Read the full Tribune-Democrat story here.

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June 3, 2010

Augeo Launch At Pack Trials

Many current PGRs are used for reducing height or crop stretch. Augeo works with the plant’s ability to release lower lateral buds and thus increase lateral branching. Augeo focuses on the young growing points of a plant (leaves and meristem). Augeo works like a chemical pinch and the end result is a reduction of the natural plant hormone auxin and the role it plays in holding back lower buds. With auxin production decreased, lower buds release, and the result is reduced apical dominance. Recent testing of Augeo has shown it to increase branching in herbaceous and woody type crops such as lantana, petunia, fuchsia, verbena and other crops including trees and shrubs. Growers are always looking for ways to increase the value of their crops. Augeo can help to improve a plants’ appearance by creating a thicker, fuller plant which is appealing to both growers and consumers. That’s just one […]

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June 3, 2010

Veranda O Label Expansion For Vegetables

Veranda O is particularly effective against botrytis and rhizoctonia on ornamentals and vegetables, according to OHP Director of Technical Services Jeff Dobbs. Rates are 4 to 8 fluid ounces per 100 gallons. Growers should use Veranda O preventatively; that is, when conditions are ripe for disease development. High humidity and cool, cloudy weather can be conducive to disease development. In the spring, growers should pay close attention to weather conditions and apply preventatively as needed. The product carries a 4-hour Restricted Entry Interval (REI) and is classified as a “biopesticide” by U.S. EPA. The short REI makes Veranda O a particularly good choice in the spring as nights are short and growers often look for products with short REI intervals. Veranda O has a 0 day preharvest interval on many vegetables. Veranda O, applied as a spray or drench, is soft on beneficial insects and predators. Veranda O is a […]

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June 3, 2010

Terrazole L Formulation Launch

Terrazole L, with its active ingredient etridiazole, is an effective soil fungicide for prevention and control of damping off, root rot, and stem diseases caused by pythium and phytophthora spp. in ornamentals and turf. Terrazole L may be used in greenhouses, nurseries, and on golf course tees and greens. The new liquid formulation offers several advantages including ease of mixing and application, lower use rates, and less odor than competitive liquid etridiazole-based fungicides. The new formulation is also ideal for chemigation applications, saving growers time and labor. The 44.3% emulsifiable concentrate (EC) formulation contains 4 pounds of the active ingredient etridiazole per gallon which is twice the amount found in competitive formulations. The increase in active ingredient means there is less solvent being used which means less odor for applicators. Additionally, research has shown this new formulation mixes readily with water and does not clog screens or filters.   Because […]

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May 11, 2010

Cleary Unveils Three New Fungicides

Three fungicides from Cleary Chemical were recently EPA certified. They are Torque, Affirm and Legend. Torque is a Tebuconazole formulation labeled for turf and ornamental uses. “This active ingredient has a long development history and excellent track record for turf disease management,” says Rick Fletcher, director of product development. Affirm WDG, meanwhile, is a replacement for Endorse WP. Affirm WDG represents a new 11.3 percent Polyoxin D formulation, which, according to Cleary, is 4.5 times more concentrated than Endorse. “In turf, the new 2.4 pounds per acre rate will greatly assist superintendents and growers by reducing the solids suspended in their application equipment,” Fletcher says. “This will be a huge benefit to the many applicators who tank mix products on a regular basis.” Legend, the third new Cleary fungicide to hit the market, is a 6 pounds-per gallon Chlorothalonil product made with Cleary’s Rainkote formulation technology. This new, easy mixing […]

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April 15, 2010

OHP’s Veranda O Fungicide: Expanding Control

OHP’s Veranda O fungicide is now labeled for vegetables and bedding plants, meaning the battle against botrytis and rhizoctonia has a new ally. The addition of vegetables to the Veranda O label gives growers the added flexibility of purchasing one product that controls diseases on both ornamental and vegetable crops. Plus, control comes in the form of an environmentally friendly fungicide that is soft on mammals, beneficial insects and birds. The fungicide carries a four-hour restricted entry interval (REI). In addition to vegetable labeling, Veranda O is labeled for control of alternaria blight, anthracnose, botrytis, fusarium, powdery mildew, sclerotinia and rhizoctonia root and crown rot on ornamentals. Active as a spray or a drench, Veranda O contains the active ingredient Polyoxin D, a natural antibiotic and fermentation product of a soil bacterium. Veranda O is also an easy-to-use water dispersible granule (WDG) formulation that features a unique mode of action, […]

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