March 2, 2009

Meet OHP’s Latest Miticide

Shuttle O is the latest miticide in OHP’s portfolio, joining Floramite, Pylon, Judo, Kontos and Triact. It features several key features that fit well into an IPM program. According to Dan Stahl, OHP vice president of marketing and business development, Shuttle O is effective on a wide range of mite species, including two spotted spider mites, spruce spider mites, citrus red mites, European red mites and Pacific spider mites, “Shuttle O is a miticide for the 21st century with the many positives it offers such as rapid knockdown, Reduced Risk classification, activity on all life stages, long residual control and a unique mode of action,” Stahl says. “In addition, Shuttle O is soft on beneficial insects.” Shuttle O has been tested on many plant species and has been shown to be safe on even tender plant material. Shuttle O is a suspension concentrate (SC) formulation and carries a 12-hour Restricted […]

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February 27, 2009

A Close-Up On Kontos

Kontos is a new systemic insecticide from OHP that derives from the tetramic acid class of chemistry. Kontos can be applied as a foliar spray or drench, and it controls a number of major sucking insect and mite pests, including Adelgids, aphids, leafhoppers, mealybugs, Psyllids, spider mites, spittlebugs and whiteflies. Kontos is both xylem and phloem active, meaning the systemic activity moves upward and downward in the treated plants. As of Feb. 4, Kontos is registered for use in more than 30 states. It’s packaged in 250-milliliter containers and ships six per case. For more information on Kontos, visit www.ohp.com.

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February 25, 2009

Pest Management Conference Presents Integrated Solutions

For 25 years, the Society of American Florists’ (SAF) Pest Management Conference has been helping growers protect their plants and profits. This was the first year Greenhouse Grower was a partner in the event, held last week in San Jose, Calif., where it all began. This conference focused on pest control began in the early 1980s, when entomologists in floriculture and other segments of agriculture were working together to address leaf miners, a pest that was ravaging chrysanthemums and other crops. Dr. Michael Parrella of the University of California (UC), Davis, enlisted SAF’s support for a set of conferences in California and Florida. The conferences were so successful in bringing researchers together to address the problem and relay the information to growers that SAF and Parrella launched a new annual conference just for our industry in 1985 in San Jose. The program has since expanded to include diseases, bringing floriculture’s […]

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February 9, 2009

Best Practices To Prevent Pest Problems

A talent for diagnosis is necessary — but not sufficient — to produce a great crop. Scouting regularly and thoroughly for symptoms and interpreting them correctly does give you the luxury of early detection, but it also is critical to practice good overall greenhouse management. Following are some best management practices (BMPs) that will help you reduce the chance that there will be symptoms you’ll need to interpret. The goal of your BMPs is to solve problems in ad­vance, safeguarding the environment by using pesticides only when necessary. 1. Let the greenhouse structure work for you, not against you. Maintain the right light level for the crop. Arrange for optimal ventilation to reduce problems with diseases like downy mildew and Botrytis. Eliminate bench and floor unevenness to eliminate puddling that exposes crops to Pythium root rot. Choose benches with impermeable surfaces like metal or plastic, so they can be easily […]

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February 9, 2009

Previewing Pest Management Conference

With the 25th annual Pest Management Conference taking place next week, here’s a look back on all seven Benchrunner Q&A’s in which we featured speakers for the Feb. 19-21 event. Searching For Solutions To Invasives February 3 Lin Schmale, senior director of government relations for the Society of American Florists, discusses what growers can do about invasive pests and pathogens, especially when quarantines are penalizing them and border inspections these days are less than thorough. Overcoming The Language Barrier January 23 Many greenhouse workers are of Hispanic origin and have little or no formal education in plant production. Carlos Bográn, associate professor and Extension specialist at Texas A&M University, shares some tips on presenting simple yet essential knowledge of pest detection and monitoring to a staff that speaks mostly Spanish. Detecting Surprise Diseases January 19 Diseases are always on the move, and it’s impossible to predict which diseases will show […]

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February 3, 2009

Searching For Solutions To Invasives

What can growers do about invasive pests and pathogens, especially when quarantines are penalizing them and border inspections these days are less than thorough? Lin Schmale, senior director of government relations for the Society of American Florists (SAF), understands the issues at hand. And she’ll lead a discussion on the matter at Pest Management Conference in two weeks. There have been plenty of invasives “horror stories” in recent history. Which invasives stand out to you? “Anyone who remembers the days of Ralstonia quarantines–and most in the industry do remember those sad days–will understand the importance of this topic. Since then, we’ve had Sudden Oak Death, gladiolus rust, chrysanthemum white rust (many times) and a lot of new insects—chilli thrips, Q-Biotype whitefly and more. And there are more to come.” What can attendees expect from the invasives portion of the program? “Success in this portion will be achieved if attendees understand […]

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January 16, 2009

Taking Out The Top Five Pests

What do mites, aphids, thrips, whiteflies and leafminers have in common? Aside from being a royal pain in the neck, they’re a motley crew that’s undoubtedly called one of your plants home at one time or another. On a recent visit to the offices of Greenhouse Grower, Bert Wagemans, the ornamental business lead for the lawn and garden team at Syngenta Professional Products, mentioned these infamous five are the top five ornamental pests globally. “Any pest insect or mite that appears on a top five or 10 listing did not get there by accident,” says Richard Lindquist, senior technical manager for OHP. According to Lindquist, a broad range of host plants can actually have a negative effect on the active ingredients in chemical pesticides that growers use, but a positive one on the pest. This wide range can give pests exposure to a number of pesticides, giving them an opportunity […]

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January 6, 2009

Notes On Neonicotinoids

Neonicotinoids are highly effective insecticides, but many questions remain about their use. James Bethke at the University of California, Riverside, will discuss neonicotinoids at the 25th annual Pest Management Conference next month. He recently shared a few thoughts on his topic as the conference approaches. What is the significance of neonicotinoids to growers? “Obviously, there is a push to reduce the amount of pesticide use in agriculture and horticulture. There is also a concern about neonicotinoid movement in the environment and its effect on pollinating bees, butterflies, drinking water contamination, etc. In addition, there is a concern about the development of resistance to the neonicotinoids. The results of our research will increase grower knowledge of the neonicotinoids, and how to use them more efficiently.” Are we at a point where much more research needs to be conducted in order to develop best practices for neonicotinoids? “We are finding that there […]

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December 30, 2008

Notes On Neonicotinoids

Neonicotinoids are highly effective insecticides, but many questions remain about their use. James Bethke, an entomologist at the University of California, Riverside, will discuss neonicotinoids at the 25th annual Pest Management Conference next month. He recently shared a few thoughts on his topic as the conference approaches. What is the significance of neonicotinoids to growers? “Obviously, there is a push to reduce the amount of pesticide use in agriculture and horticulture. There is also a concern about neonicotinoid movement in the environment and its effect on pollinating bees, butterflies, drinking water contamination, etc. In addition, there is a concern about the development of resistance to the neonicotinoids. The results of our research will increase grower knowledge of the neonicotinoids, and how to use them more efficiently.” Are we at a point where much more research needs to be conducted in order to develop best practices for neonicotinoids? “We are finding […]

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December 9, 2008

Tackling Invasives At Pest Management

The 25th annual Pest Management Conference, presented by Society of American Florists and Greenhouse Grower, will feature more than 25 expert-led sessions in San Jose, Calif.  New and emerging pests, strategies for resistance, tricks to reduce weeds, dealing with viruses and managing invasives–an item that’s surely on the top of your mind–are among the many topics experts will discuss. Don’t forget to register early to save, and keep an eye on Benchrunner in the coming weeks for more details about the experts’ presentations. The conference takes place Feb. 19-21, and attendees can earn credits toward their pesticide applicator recertification while there. Just be sure to bring your state-issued applicator or certification number. And don’t forget about the optional growing operations tour Feb. 19. Attendees will visit local operations to see what exactly those growers are doing to manage pests and diseases. For more information on the conference or to register, visit www.pestconference.org. You’ll find more on recertification […]

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December 3, 2008

Integrating Biologicals

Over the next 25 years, BioWorks will continue to be an industry leader in developing and commercializing environmentally responsible, safe and cost-effective solutions to the horticulture industry. As the momentum for the sustainability movement continues, growers will demand that the products (e.g., inputs) they use are safe to their crops, their employees and have minimal effect on local and global environments. Consumers are demanding a safe, high-quality food supply. BioWorks’ efforts will help support these demands. Further, integrating biological and biorational pest control products with traditional chemical products provides an ideal tool for the grower to combat the development of chemically-resistant pests and minimize chemical pesticide residue concerns. At BioWorks, we are continually asking the question: “How can we make our products better and more user-friendly?” We are constantly looking for better ways to manufacture our products to achieve the highest quality, efficacy and safety possible. Better formulations, including materials […]

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