September 22, 2008

Q-Biotype: What Does It Mean?

A new study shows growers may be keeping a watchful eye on the Q-biotype situation, but many have treatment practices in place that may inadvertently encourage resistance, not fight it. The Q-2006 study was a collaboration of key industry organizations: OFA–an Association of Floriculture Professionals, Society of America Florists (SAF), American Nursery and Landscape Association (ANLA), Florida Nursery Growers and Landscape Association (FNGLA), USDA’s IR-4 and Valent Professional Products. “There’s a lot of talk, and frankly, some fear-driven confusion in the industry about Q-biotype,” says Dr. Joe Chamberlin, field market development specialist with Valent. “Some growers are worrying too much; some may not be taking it seriously enough. The study collaborators saw this survey as a great opportunity to understand what is going on in growers’ minds, and help get the smartest scouting, testing and treatment practices in place to address Q-biotype and overall resistance.” Dr. Lance Osborne, University of Florida […]

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August 21, 2008

Biologicals And Compost Teas Make Media Come Alive

There was a time not long ago when all growers thought that compost or soil in a media mix meant fungal disease problems. A shift is happening in some areas of floriculture to move to media inoculated with compost and living organisms, making a more natural environment for plant growth, with the advantages of increased fertilizer uptake and defenses against pests and diseases. In some instances, biological agents are being added by growers themselves to enrich soils, while some suppliers are offering media premixed with organisms that protect plants. Making Media Alive When growers use a traditional media without live organisms, they don’t enjoy the benefits from nutrient cycling. In a natural environment, microorganisms feed off the plant’s released sugars and the organism provides the plant with nutrients and water, explains Michael Alms, president of Growing Solutions. The company sells the compost tea extractors that provide growers with microorganisms.  “With […]

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August 14, 2008

RootShield WP

Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 RootShield® WP is a new and improved formulation of the highly effective biological fungicide PlantShield® HC–with a water soluble carrier.  RootShield WP protects roots from the most common root diseases affecting greenhouse, nursery and vegetable crops.  The active ingredient, Trichoderma harzianum strain T-22 prevents Pythium, Rhizoctonia, Fusarium, Cylindrocladium and Thielaviopsis by blocking and actively attacking pathogens–”eating” them before they reach the root system. The new RootShield WP makes mixing easier, with its water soluble carrier and virtually clay-free formulation to eliminate clogging.  Additionally, it has a broader label to encompass even more crops, and is labeled for field chemigation. RootShield WP has a 0-hour REI and can lower growers’ costs by eliminating or reducing the need for chemical root fungicides, and saving material and labor costs of repetitive drenching.  One application provides up to 12 weeks of protection and costs less than 1 to […]

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July 9, 2008

Insecticide For Thrips Control

“There is scientifically documented resistance by western flower thrips to several leading thrips products, and many growers are in need of products with new modes of action,” says Joe Chamberlin, field market development specialist for Valent. “The chemical industry has introduced very few effective thrips materials in the last 10 years, and in many cases growers are down to one effective product. Overture is a valuable tool for growers seeking effective control, Chamberlin says, because it acts through both contact and ingestion activity. It controls immature and adult thrips. “Overture has a unique mode of action and can therefore be rotated with all other thrips chemistries,” Chamberlin says. “By introducing Overture into a pest management program, growers can alleviate current problems with resistant thrips, and also slow development of resistance to currently effective products.” For more information about Overture or other products from Valent, click here.

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June 23, 2008

Identifying Natural Enemies

A new pocket guide developed by the Michigan State University (MSU) Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program can make the identification of insects and spiders easier. “Identifying Natural Enemies in Field Crops” (MSU Extension Bulletin E2949) is geared for field crops, but the guide is appropriate for use with other crops. It provides information about a variety of common beneficial insects, both predators and parasitoids. The 46-page field guide features color pictures of common beneficial insects and spiders, in addition to information on identifiable traits and details about their lifecycles and diets. Contents are divided according to the major category of natural enemy: beetles, true bugs, lacewings, predatory flies, parasitoids and ants. Another section is dedicated to spiders. “Identifying Natural Enemies in Field Crops” is available for $10 ($7 per copy for orders of 10 or more) and can be purchased online at www.emdc.msue.msu.edu/ or by calling 517-353-6740. Sample pages can […]

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June 18, 2008

New Whitefly Biotype Has Growers Concerned

Two of the more devastating silverleaf whitefly biotypes are the B and Q biotypes. The B type has been in the United States since its discovery in 1985, and the Q type is still a grower concern in 25 states. Both types of whiteflies can reduce the yield of a broad range of agricultural, fiber, vegetable and ornamental crops. The aggressive B biotype arrived in the U.S. from its native Middle East and Asia Minor range, and it threatened agricultural production throughout the southern United States until new integrated pest management strategies brought it into check. The Q type brings new challenges. The biotype was first detected in the U.S. in December 2004 on poinsettias from an Arizona retail outlet. Compared to the B biotype, Q is less susceptible to many pesticide types, which means there are fewer chemical options for its control. There is also concern that resistance to […]

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June 16, 2008

Now Available

•  Dow Agrosciences Dow has received federal registration for Dimension 2EW, a new formulation of the widely used Dimension crabgrass preventer that can be sprayed over the top of field-grown nursery ornamentals and landscape ornamentals for preemergence control of more than 40 grassy and broadleaf weeds. www.dimensionherbicide.com •  Phyton Phyton-27 New Dimension bactericide and fungicide has been issued a California registration covering spray, low-volume, dip, drench and injection applications in the greenhouse, field or nursery, landscape and interiorscape. Phyton-27 New Dimension delivers broad spectrum control including: Botrytis, Cercospora, Cylindrocladium, Anthracnose, Black Spot, Powdery Mildew, Volutella, Alternaria, downy mildew, rust, Scab, Rhizoctonia, Phytophthora, Verticillium, Entomosporium, Pythium, Erwinia, Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas. www.phyton-27.com •  OHP FenStop Fungicide received federal registration in late 2006 and is now gaining state registrations. FenStop provides exceptional control of downy mildew, aerial Phytophthora as well as the root disease complex of Pythium and Phytophthora. www.ohp.com •  Syngenta A […]

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June 16, 2008

Knowledge Is Power

Like the swallows to Capistrano, the Crop Protection Handbook has returned for a 93rd edition. For 2007, the all-new Crop Protection Handbook Power Pack includes the print Crop Protection Handbook, the eHandbook CD-ROM and the Global Crop Protection Database and other vital information resources housed at www.meisterpro.com. What’s Inside Here’s what’s in the print edition: Crop Protection Dictionary. The heart of the Handbook is technical, registration and environmental/safety data on every active ingredient and brand name in the global market. New for 2007: Mode of action and action class information for hundreds of active ingredients. Fertilizer Dictionary. Terms and definitions cover agronomics, application, organic materials, manufacturing processes and fertilizer products. A Nutrient Suppliers list provides access to a variety of nitrogen, phosphate, mixed fertilizer and micronutrient suppliers. Sustainable Agriculture. This section focuses on practices such as Integrated Pest Management, genetically enhanced seed, biocontrols, organic production and reduced-risk products. Regulatory Compliance. […]

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June 12, 2008

All Predatory Mites Are Not Created Equal

Have you ever considered implementing a biological control program in your greenhouse operation? Well, first of all, what is biological control? Biological control involves the release or application of natural enemies including parasitoids (parasitic wasps), predators and pathogens (in this case entomopathogenic fungi and nematodes) into a greenhouse in order to regulate an existing insect or mite pest population. One of the most widely used groups of natural enemies are predatory mites, which are commercially available from most biological control suppliers. There are a number of predatory mite species commercially available that are in the family Phytoseiidae, including Phytoseiulus persimilis, Neoseiulus fallacis, Neoseiulus californicus, Nesoseiulus longipes and Galendromus occidentalis. It is important to understand the behavioral characteristics of predatory mites before implementing a biological control program since behavioral responses to plant volatiles, feeding preferences and dispersal of predatory mites will influence their ability to provide control or regulate different “levels” […]

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June 12, 2008

Partners Against Pests

As researchers and extension specialists work with growers to reach that perfect balance of efficacy and economy in their pest control programs, many find that the pests themselves aren’t the only challenge. Another is the myth that use of conventional chemicals and biopesticides is an either/or proposition. IPM advocates admit it’s easy to see how this myth got started. Organic growers use biopesticides as a stand-alone because most products are registered for use on organic crops. So biopesticides are often linked to organic production. But in reality, only organic growers use biopesticides exclusively. In fact, organic production represents only a small percentage of biopesticide use. All things considered–economics, efficacy, sustainability and crop quality–traditional growers are learning that a program using biopesticides alongside conventionals is often most effective.  Too Much Of A Good Thing Resistance management is one piece of that puzzle. Hired in 1989 as an entomologist at the University of […]

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June 12, 2008

Essential Oils

Whitmire Micro-Gen has introduced a new line of horticultural oils based on unsurpassed purity. Horticultural oils have been used in the greenhouse and nursery markets for years to effectively control a wide range of insects, mites and diseases on a variety of crops from fruit trees to bedding plants and vegetables. Horticultural oils work by smothering the pest, offering an additional mode of action in rotation programs to prevent resistance buildup. Pests have no resistance to known oils. There are four factors that determine the efficacy and safety of a horticultural oil product. 1) The distillation midpoint  2) The distillation range 3) The purity of the oil 4) Emulsifier selection The distillation midpoint, measured in degrees Fahrenheit, is the point at which 50 percent of the oil has distilled. The higher the distillation midpoint, the longer the oil stays on the plant, allowing it to kill more pests. However, if […]

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