December 2, 2013

Plant Breeder Amanda Hershberger: Pest And Disease Resistances Is Within Our Grasp

Amanda Hershberger is a plant breeder for Syngenta. She holds a B.S. in horticulture from Purdue University and an M.S. and Ph.D. in horticulture from the University of Georgia. GG: How will breeders address needs to reduce chemicals by increasing crop resistance to pests and diseases? How far away is this technology? Hershberger: Resistance breeding is vital to the success of many crops and reduces the need for chemical control, as well as reducing the pest’s development of resistance to a chemical control. My personal work experience involves resistance of vinca to Phytophthora. Breeding for pest and disease resistance in ornamental plants has primarily utilized traditional breeding methods. Resistance breeding has also included molecular methods for problems such as black spot in rose and Fusarium in carnation. Agronomic crops have really paved the way for resistance development using molecular markers. I foresee a greater use of molecular techniques to achieve resistance […]

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December 2, 2013

Plant Breeder Joseph Tychonievich: Rock Gardening Will Be The Next Big Gardening Trend

Take a look at the other trends Tychonievich says he sees shaping the next 30 years of the greenhouse industry.

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Richard Jones

December 2, 2013

Predicting The Future Of Your Business [Opinion]

Making predictions about the future of the greenhouse industry is hazardous business. But as with anything, to be successful you have to take some risks.

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December 2, 2013

Plant Breeder Kelly Norris: Breeders Must Be Champions Of New Genera

Kelly Norris is currently the horticulture director at the Greater Des Moines Botanical Garden and he holds two degrees (B.S., M.S.) in horticulture from Iowa State University. Norris has been part of the industry since age 15, when he talked his parents into buying a nursery and moving it from Texas to their family farm in Iowa. As the owner of Rainbow Iris Farm, he started breeding irises 12 years ago and continues to focus on breeding independently, as well as in the new breeding program at the botanical garden. GG: As a young breeder, what direction do you feel breeding is headed? Norris: I feel there are two kinds of plant breeders entering the market today. There are those coming of out graduate school looking for jobs in the industry (which aren’t plentiful) and end up toiling away with petunias and commodity crops. I feel for them. Then there […]

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Plantduino greenhouse using Arduino

December 2, 2013

Tomorrow’s Greenhouse Techs Are In School STEM Programs Today

Science, technology, engineering and mathematics programs at the grade-school level are turning out more students familiar with engineering and computer technologies.

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December 2, 2013

Plant Breeder Ockert Greyvenstein: Minimal Inputs Are A Future Breeding Requirement

Greyvenstein also says edible landscapes and hardy grasses will become more relevant floriculture crops.

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GROW Summit 2013

December 2, 2013

GROW Summit 2013 Focuses On Engaging The Next Generation

As an industry, we must change the mindsets of our existing and potential customers. We also need to do some rethinking of our own. That was the prevailing message of Greenhouse Grower’s second GROW Summit.

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December 2, 2013

Plant Breeder Ping Ren: Breeding Must Meet Consumer And Grower Needs

Jianping (Ping) Ren breeds various seed and vegetatively propagated annuals and perennials for PanAmerican Seed, where she has worked for 13 years. Ren received a Ph.D. in plant breeding in 1998 at Cornell University. Before coming to the floriculture industry, Ren was a vegetable breeder in China with a focus on Brassica vegetables. GG: Will the fervor for all new varieties continue in the industry?  Ren: There are so many new varieties each year. It can be confusing and sometimes difficult for growers and consumers to keep up. But we are all looking for “new” things all the time. There has to be something “new” each year. Of course, some new varieties are new for certain improved traits, which are necessary and can benefit breeding companies (high yield, reduced cost), growers (high germ, more uniform) and consumers (better color and garden performance). The more exciting new for the industry is “true” new […]

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Vineland Research and Innovation Centre's prototype packaging system

December 2, 2013

Future Greenhouse Automation Will Assist The Grower’s Expertise

This glimpse into the future is based on today’s rapidly evolving automation technologies.

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Google Glass

December 2, 2013

A Day In The Life Of A Grower: 2020

At the current rate of technological advancement and the drive to automate business processes to improve efficiencies, there are sure to be many changes for greenhouse growers in the next few years.

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December 2, 2013

5 Areas That Will Reshape The Future Of Production

Regardless of what the future brings, greenhouse growers will always seek to take production practices to new levels that save time, money and environmental resources. New products and research in the areas of lighting, energy conservation, fertilizer, irrigation and growing media will help make your jobs easier. Energy-Efficient Lighting An increasing number of lighting sources that use less energy, have a longer lifespan and produce less heat are showing up on the market. Recent products utilize advanced reflector and induction technology to improve light output and uniformity, ultimately producing higher yield-per-watt ratios. Growers have focused their attention on light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as a supplemental light source and potentially a replacement for natural light. Advances in lighting technology show that with the right light, plants can be grown just about anywhere. Recent research has centered on using LEDs to alter the color, taste, smell, postharvest life and other characteristics of plants, […]

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