Craig_Top100Breakfast

August 13, 2015

Craig Regelbrugge Receives National Plant Board Partnership Award

The National Plant Board has awarded Craig Regelbrugge, the AmericanHort senior vice president with its Outstanding Partnership Award for industry advocacy and research. The award was presented at the Plant Board’s annual meeting, held August 3-6, 2015, in Arizona. In presenting the award, Plant Board president Geir Friisoe of the Minnesota Department of Agriculture noted that Regelbrugge has collaborated with the board for more than 25 years. He has represented the horticulture industry in numerous initiatives to improve federal and state plant health programs and to harmonize plant pest quarantine efforts such as for the Japanese beetle. Regelbrugge led the effort to publish the first nationwide summary of each state’s plant quarantine and shipping requirements. The summaries are now available online at nationalplantboard.org. In 1999, Regelbrugge was invited by the National Plant Board to co-chair an in-depth stakeholder review of the USDA’s plant pest prevention and early detection programs. The Safeguarding American […]

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Rose-Rosette-Knockout-May-2013-A-Windham_featured

August 12, 2015

University Of Florida Researchers Look For Cure For Rose Rosette Virus

Researchers at the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) are racing to find a cure for rose rosette disease, which is decimating the rose industry in other states. “Rose rosette is a devastating disease and one of the worst things to come along,” says Gary Knox, professor of environmental horticulture and Extension specialist in nursery crops. “So, we have formed a multistate comprehensive project to find a cure.” The challenge is in detecting the disease before symptoms arrive, Knox says. “A nursery might not know it has the disease and sell rose plants to unsuspecting customers. Months later, the disease shows up,” he says. “The major issue is being able to detect the virus before it shows up.” Rose rosette was first discovered in Florida in December 2013. The disease is caused by a mite called Phyllocoptes fructiphilus, which infects the flower with a virus, says […]

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Christina Salwitz 2014_featured

August 12, 2015

Christina Salwitz Says Women Bring A Unique Perspective To The Industry

Garden writer Christina Salwitz is a powerhouse in the industry. She is an expert container designer, works at an independent garden center and runs her own blog. Salwitz is active on social media, and she fights for the industry’s ability to stay autonomous from the big box stores. Most importantly, Salwitz stands out in a field of garden industry people as a design and color specialist who can bring something brilliant and unique to the end consumer. Her garden design business, established in 1998, started with landscaping, then evolved into container design because of increased demand for her unique and color-filled designs. Salwitz continues to work at an independent garden center in order to connect directly with the consumer. She also evolved and expanded her business by blogging, authoring books such as “Fine Foliage” with co-author Karen Chapman, and concentrating on horticultural photography. Demand grew for her work, and by March 2014 her designs were […]

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NFF_Bailey_greenhouses

August 12, 2015

2016 National Floriculture Forum To Travel To The Netherlands And Germany

The 2016 National Floriculture Forum (NFF) is going to the Netherlands and the International Trade Fair for Plants (IPM) in Essen, Germany from January 24-29, 2016. The theme for the 2016 NFF program is International Floriculture, and the venue will be totally different from recent years. This horticulture trip will be an intense five days (plus two days of travel). The NFF will spend the first three days in the Netherlands visiting greenhouse operations, the flower auction and other horticultural sites. The NFF is an annual educational meeting for greenhouse growers, industry leaders, university faculty, graduate students and government scientists from academic institutions, governmental agencies and the greenhouse industry. This group of floriculturists has been meeting since 1999. The NFF brings together diverse floricultural communities with the objectives of addressing issues of importance to the floriculture industry, forming collaborative relationships and improving communication within the American floriculture industry to share and disseminate information. This meeting […]

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WaterPulse retail mats can help cut water use in retail settings

August 10, 2015

Technology Provides Solutions For Growing In Drought

In April, California Gov. Jerry Brown directed the State Water Resources Control Board to institute reductions in cities and towns across the state with the goal of reducing water usage by 25 percent. The announcement comes following the lowest snowpack ever recorded in the High Sierra. It was the first time in state history that action was taken to implement mandatory water restrictions. In May, the farmers in California’s Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta agreed to reduce their water use by 25 percent in exchange for assurance that they will not face further curtailment during the June to September growing season. Their proposal was approved by the State Water Resources Control Board. Growers who participate in the program could opt to either reduce water diversions under their riparian rights by 25 percent, or fallow 25 percent of their land. Given these conditions, growers and retailers are in need of methods and […]

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cannabis, marijuana plant

August 7, 2015

The California Effect: 2016 Could Be A Watershed Year For Cannabis Legalization

For growers who are looking at the potential for cannabis production but are trying to get a sense for the regulatory lay of the land – know that 2016 could be a watershed year for cannabis legalization.

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cannabis

August 7, 2015

Cannabis Producer Solstice Provides Insight To Greenhouse Growers

To gain some real-world insight about what it takes to produce and sell cannabis, and some of the challenges and roadblocks involved, Greenhouse Grower reached out to Solstice, a producer and processor of cannabis for medical and adult use in Washington state. Alex Cooley, the co-founder and vice president of Solstice, gave us an exclusive interview, and answered the following questions to give greenhouse growers a glimpse into different aspects involved in cannabis production. Visit the Solstice website or follow Solstice on Twitter @SolsticeGrown for more information. Greenhouse Grower (GG): First, let’s get to know you. Could you tell us some background about Solstice and how it got started? Alex Cooley: We started Solstice in 2011 to help legitimize the medical cannabis marketplace by providing consistent, lab-tested cannabis of high quality and creating the state’s first cultivation brand. It was started by myself and two other partners, Will Denman and […]

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July 30, 2015

Spread Your Risk Beyond Spring Sales [Opinion]

Growers who participated in Greenhouse Grower’s 2015 Spring Crops Recap Survey said they have had enough of the uncertainty that the weather brings. They said it’s time to build up sales in other seasons like fall so we’re not so dependent on spring. As a couple of wholesale growers, both from the Southeast, very eloquently stated, our industry has mastered squeezing everything we can out of the spring season. And while this year happened to be a very successful one, thanks to the improving economy and elevated consumer confidence, they said, “now is no time to celebrate.” “Spring is still Christmas in the horticulture industry, but we have done such a good job focusing on spring that we have neglected other seasons,” one grower said. “Having so many eggs in the spring basket is dangerous. Fall will never be what spring is, but having a solid second season is in […]

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Mike McGroarty, owner of Mike’s Backyard Nursery

July 29, 2015

Backyard Success: Mike McGroarty Educates Aspiring Growers

Mike’s Backyard Nursery sits on a long, narrow, 5-acre property located in Perry, Ohio. There, customers can find a variety of flowering shrubs available, all in 2-quart pots, and all for sale for $5.97 each. Owner Mike McGroarty, a lifelong resident of Perry, says the town has a lot of plant nurseries, including 100 wholesale growers within a 10-mile radius of his house. That doesn’t discourage McGroarty, because he knows that while there are a lot of nurseries in his area, no one else is doing what he is doing. McGroarty has learned about plants — and marketing them to his audience — through decades of experience. He has never hesitated to pass along his knowledge to other growers looking to start their own backyard operations, and has created an entire program to educate aspiring growers. McGroarty Likes To Practice What He Preaches McGroarty’s operation serves as the laboratory for […]

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July 29, 2015

2015 Spring Crops Report: Rain Soaks Spring Sales

Rain, rain and more rain. That was the story this spring for the large majority of growers across the U.S. And where it wasn’t too wet, it was too dry. Drought conditions cut sales in the West and Southwest. But it wasn’t all bad. Eighty-nine percent of respondents to Greenhouse Grower’s 2015 Spring Crops Survey declared the season a success, despite its challenges. They said beautiful weather in April and excited consumers who were ready to spend got the season going early, but then cool temps and rainy weekends throughout May and June caused confusion over when and how much to plant. Of the 189 respondents to Greenhouse Grower’s 2015 Spring Recap Survey, 53 percent identified themselves as grower-retailers, 34 percent were wholesale growers and 13 percent said they were young plant growers. Most responses came from the Midwest (27 percent), Northeast (18 percent) and Southeast (16 percent), but also […]

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Cal-Poly fields

July 28, 2015

Cal-Poly To Preserve Campus Agricultural Land

California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo will no longer consider development of nearly 43 acres of prime agricultural land just west of its campus core, as the university proceeds with the two-year process of updating its campus master plan. In May, the university had released an update to its Master Plan that indicated that almost all of its orchards, horticulture facilities and field sites may be repurposed for future development of university housing and other campus infrastructure. Most of the land in question is classified Class 1 farmland. The acreage is used now for lemons, grapevines, mandarin oranges, a deciduous orchard and silage for the university’s livestock. The proposed changes would have directly affected the current orchard plantings and other long term plans for the department, according to a letter from Scott Steinmaus, the horticulture and crop science department head. Steinmaus encouraged industry members to submit their comments to the university. An […]

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