Blue Orchid Debuts From Silver Vase

Blue Orchid Debuts From Silver Vase

Silver Vase has introduced the Blue Mystique orchid, which features longlasting blooms that shine electric blue on a dramatic single or double spike.

Blue Mystique is not painted or hybridized, but gets its color through a patented process that induces the blue color in flowers.

“The future flowers that are on the stem are going to be blue,” says Silver Vase CEO Andrew Bartha. “It’s not painted or sprayed. It’s the rave in Europe and it’s pretty much the trend of the future for certain tones in orchids.” The process takes between 48 and 90 hours to induce the blue color.

Blue Mystique thrives in low to medium light and comes in a 5-inch pot.

“We’re pleased to give a first look at the hottest new variety the orchid world has seen in years,” Bartha says. “Blue Mystique is truly the most unique orchid on the market.”

Silver Vase debuted Blue Mystique at the Tropical Plant Industry Exhibition (TPIE) in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Orders are being taken now. 

Tell us what you think about Blue Mystique on Facebook. For more information on it, visit SilverVase.com.

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50 comments on “Blue Orchid Debuts From Silver Vase

  1. Chemically induced blue phalaenopsis? Clever, novel, horrid abomination! I’m surprised it is the rage in Europe, but will no doubt be popular in the USA where tacky often passes for style. I hate to see that it has come to this. The white ones in the photo are lovely… and natural.

  2. We just purchased two of these orchids for $80.00 (on sale). I’m pretty sure we just got screwed!
    I remember when we were kids and old Mr. Wizard on TV showed us how to turn just about any white cut flower into any color you’d like by freshly cutting their stems and placing them into a vase containing dyed water. In a couple of days the dye migrated up the stem and throughout the flower to color it. Seems to me a variation of this is the way these orchids have bacome “blue”. I believe this is fraud at the vary least. It is obvious that there’s been no genetic manipulation to develop a true blue orchid. These babys are heading back to the garden center for a refund!

  3. My husband was so excited to see a new variety of Orchid, he bought it for me as a surprise. The first thing I thought was “IT’S SO UGLY…” but, instead all I said was “Thank you honey, I love it!”.

    Even my 12 year old son knew how fake this Orchid looked. He explained to my husband that someone probably dumped blue food coloring into the water “just like we learned in science”.

    It’s hideous and definitely not from nature.

  4. I LOVE the Blue Mystique and they are Gorgeous in person I own one and mine was less than $20 bucks!! To me the process looks natural and I love the Happy Spring color and with this awful winter we have had it makes my heart happy!!!

  5. I thought these were lovely, then learned ‘the secret’ that they’re not blue at all, simply white orchids dyed blue. YUK.

  6. To the “tasteful” Anonymus! These orchids are on display at our garden show in the US and are “outrageous” and people “love” them. You were right–they “are” popular in the US!

    You might reconsider your broad sweeping statement about “taste” with just those of us in the US–as these are going to be popular “everywhere”. In the gardening world, blue is the ever sought after color. Everyone gravitates to blue. Many of us Americans have difficulty growing delphiniums and most of us cannot even consider the stellar Blue Himalayan Poppy.

    Why on earth would you be surprised that the blue orchid is “also” the rage in Europe? It’s obvious to me with the British obssession for everything cobalt blue—blue painted doors, benches, even blue hydrangeas (which, by the way, which are sometimes also “chemically” induced.

    I’d love to read your entire dissertation on your observations about style and taste. Please advise when that becomes available.

    Yes indeed, the white and “natural” orchids in the photo do look lovely (as you mentioned)–especially against the background of the Blue Mystique Orchid! Chill.

  7. To posting submitted by “tacky american”. I am American but travel frequently to Europe on floral business. I’ve been in the business for many years. I agree that blue is a beautiful color. In fact it’s my favorite color, but not the Blue Mystique Orchid. Sorry. Please also read what others are saying. As for blue hydrangeas they are more blue when they aren’t MnSO4 deficient. They are not chemically induced as you suggest. Neither of us, but the market will ultimately decide. The public may need to know however that it is not natural in order to avoid the impression that they have been tricked, to put it kindly. I don’t think we need more gimics in this business. While I may disagree with your opinion I respect your right to it. Please do the same for me and others. Kind regards to all.

  8. I was just about to buy one of these orchids. Blue is my favorite color but I was hoping for a natural ‘true’ blue. It would never be the same when I look at it now that I know it’s true colors.

  9. I first saw this orchid this past weekend at an orchid store here in Manhattan. There is something unnatural about the blue, it’s saturation makes it look as if the orchid has been dipped in aniline dye. I thought it had been irradiated. You know something’s strange, especially if you sit this blue orchid near any other living plant. The thing is, I love blue flowers of all kinds, just not this one.

  10. plants for the average person is all about what catches your eye, brings a smile to your face, and brings a pleasant feeling. Plant specialists stare in horror. But there are far more non specialists of the plant world. In a public environment I have personnally witnessed awe upon the sight of this blue orchid. After all to the general population aren’t flowers enjoyed for their color and uniqueness?

  11. Just spent two month in Germany and saw this beautiful blue Orchid. Germans understand something about their flowers that puts any American gardener in the shadow.
    Yes, blue mystic is the rage in Europe.
    To my great joy and surprise I found Blue Mystic in our local grocery store here in Ohio and for $ 29.99 brought this gorgeous plant home to be with my other blooming orchids.
    Someone wants to talk about kitsch? Then go an look around your neighborhood. Don’t bash Blue Mystic – she is beautiful.
    Best regards – a German

  12. I’m amazed at all the negativity…grown by professionals, for something unique, this is an amazing orchid. I am an avoid collector/grower and appreciate this beautiful blue. If one doesn’t desire the blue mystique, dont purchase it. But beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Respect…

  13. I too am amazed at the negativity. Half of you that dont like this beautiful orchid probably don’t even know how to take care of one. And its fake? How many of you have “fake” boobs that dont like this “fake” plant? Yea, thats what I thought.

  14. I wouldn’t feel like we got SCREWED if it did not cost us $29.99. Glad we didn’t get the $39.99 one.
    It’s different and that is why we bought it but never thought the next growth would be white!!!!

  15. I wanted one just because it made me smile. I expect a white orchid next year, sure but I paid average price and the plant itself is heathy. I’ve seen collector’s go ga-ga over seriously ugly flowers. If you like it great! If it’s not you, Great! Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, isn’t it?

  16. Saw them at Home Depot today and thought they looked very unnatural but intriguing. Almost something out of Avatar I just wished they would glow in the dark. At first I thought it was some joke of genetic engineering until I saw a puncture site at the lower segment of the spike with dark blue dye that stained my thumb readily.
    I turned away right away not able to comprehend how this type of scam is tolerated or it being labeled the first blue in the world.

  17. Saw them at Home Depot today and thought they looked very unnatural but intriguing. Almost something out of Avatar I just wished they would glow in the dark. At first I thought it was some joke of genetic engineering until I saw a puncture site at the lower segment of the spike with dark blue dye that stained my thumb readily.
    I turned away right away not able to comprehend how this type of scam is tolerated or it being labeled the first blue in the world.

  18. I bought one at a local home and garden store because the bright blue caught my eye. It does look dyed, but time will tell. The plant seems hardy and healthy and I will enjoy it, and all my orchids. I like pretty colors in all things, and I’m enjoying it.

  19. I too just bought one today from home depot and don’t care that it turned out to be “fake”. It is still a real, healthy orchid . We have had such a looong winter, in fact it snowed again this morning! I loved the look and intensity of the thing and figured over time the new flowers would fade and I would add aluminum sulfate as they do with the blue hydrangeas but alas, it has been injected into the stem with something to make it this blue. Oh well, I’ll enjoy the blue blooms while they last. Oh! And I have real boobs as well! Yeahoo, love that blue!!

  20. I just got this orchid for Mother’s Day from my son, and I think it is just gorgeous! I love it, it takes my breath away it is so beautiful. I’ll be the first to admit I’m not an expert on orchids, this is my first. But I love it. It is stunningly beautiful.

    I will ask this; how many of you women, (or men, for that matter) have naturally colored hair? Or naturally white teeth? Think about it.

    Get over it!! They are beautiful.

    Tianca

  21. Chemically induced blue phalaenopsis? Clever, novel, horrid abomination! I’m surprised it is the rage in Europe, but will no doubt be popular in the USA where tacky often passes for style. I hate to see that it has come to this. The white ones in the photo are lovely… and natural.

  22. We just purchased two of these orchids for $80.00 (on sale). I’m pretty sure we just got screwed!
    I remember when we were kids and old Mr. Wizard on TV showed us how to turn just about any white cut flower into any color you’d like by freshly cutting their stems and placing them into a vase containing dyed water. In a couple of days the dye migrated up the stem and throughout the flower to color it. Seems to me a variation of this is the way these orchids have bacome “blue”. I believe this is fraud at the vary least. It is obvious that there’s been no genetic manipulation to develop a true blue orchid. These babys are heading back to the garden center for a refund!

  23. My husband was so excited to see a new variety of Orchid, he bought it for me as a surprise. The first thing I thought was “IT’S SO UGLY…” but, instead all I said was “Thank you honey, I love it!”.

    Even my 12 year old son knew how fake this Orchid looked. He explained to my husband that someone probably dumped blue food coloring into the water “just like we learned in science”.

    It’s hideous and definitely not from nature.

  24. I LOVE the Blue Mystique and they are Gorgeous in person I own one and mine was less than $20 bucks!! To me the process looks natural and I love the Happy Spring color and with this awful winter we have had it makes my heart happy!!!

  25. I thought these were lovely, then learned ‘the secret’ that they’re not blue at all, simply white orchids dyed blue. YUK.

  26. To the “tasteful” Anonymus! These orchids are on display at our garden show in the US and are “outrageous” and people “love” them. You were right–they “are” popular in the US!

    You might reconsider your broad sweeping statement about “taste” with just those of us in the US–as these are going to be popular “everywhere”. In the gardening world, blue is the ever sought after color. Everyone gravitates to blue. Many of us Americans have difficulty growing delphiniums and most of us cannot even consider the stellar Blue Himalayan Poppy.

    Why on earth would you be surprised that the blue orchid is “also” the rage in Europe? It’s obvious to me with the British obssession for everything cobalt blue—blue painted doors, benches, even blue hydrangeas (which, by the way, which are sometimes also “chemically” induced.

    I’d love to read your entire dissertation on your observations about style and taste. Please advise when that becomes available.

    Yes indeed, the white and “natural” orchids in the photo do look lovely (as you mentioned)–especially against the background of the Blue Mystique Orchid! Chill.

  27. To posting submitted by “tacky american”. I am American but travel frequently to Europe on floral business. I’ve been in the business for many years. I agree that blue is a beautiful color. In fact it’s my favorite color, but not the Blue Mystique Orchid. Sorry. Please also read what others are saying. As for blue hydrangeas they are more blue when they aren’t MnSO4 deficient. They are not chemically induced as you suggest. Neither of us, but the market will ultimately decide. The public may need to know however that it is not natural in order to avoid the impression that they have been tricked, to put it kindly. I don’t think we need more gimics in this business. While I may disagree with your opinion I respect your right to it. Please do the same for me and others. Kind regards to all.

  28. I was just about to buy one of these orchids. Blue is my favorite color but I was hoping for a natural ‘true’ blue. It would never be the same when I look at it now that I know it’s true colors.

  29. I first saw this orchid this past weekend at an orchid store here in Manhattan. There is something unnatural about the blue, it’s saturation makes it look as if the orchid has been dipped in aniline dye. I thought it had been irradiated. You know something’s strange, especially if you sit this blue orchid near any other living plant. The thing is, I love blue flowers of all kinds, just not this one.

  30. plants for the average person is all about what catches your eye, brings a smile to your face, and brings a pleasant feeling. Plant specialists stare in horror. But there are far more non specialists of the plant world. In a public environment I have personnally witnessed awe upon the sight of this blue orchid. After all to the general population aren’t flowers enjoyed for their color and uniqueness?

  31. Just spent two month in Germany and saw this beautiful blue Orchid. Germans understand something about their flowers that puts any American gardener in the shadow.
    Yes, blue mystic is the rage in Europe.
    To my great joy and surprise I found Blue Mystic in our local grocery store here in Ohio and for $ 29.99 brought this gorgeous plant home to be with my other blooming orchids.
    Someone wants to talk about kitsch? Then go an look around your neighborhood. Don’t bash Blue Mystic – she is beautiful.
    Best regards – a German

  32. I’m amazed at all the negativity…grown by professionals, for something unique, this is an amazing orchid. I am an avoid collector/grower and appreciate this beautiful blue. If one doesn’t desire the blue mystique, dont purchase it. But beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Respect…

  33. I too am amazed at the negativity. Half of you that dont like this beautiful orchid probably don’t even know how to take care of one. And its fake? How many of you have “fake” boobs that dont like this “fake” plant? Yea, thats what I thought.

  34. I wouldn’t feel like we got SCREWED if it did not cost us $29.99. Glad we didn’t get the $39.99 one.
    It’s different and that is why we bought it but never thought the next growth would be white!!!!

  35. I wanted one just because it made me smile. I expect a white orchid next year, sure but I paid average price and the plant itself is heathy. I’ve seen collector’s go ga-ga over seriously ugly flowers. If you like it great! If it’s not you, Great! Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, isn’t it?

  36. Saw them at Home Depot today and thought they looked very unnatural but intriguing. Almost something out of Avatar I just wished they would glow in the dark. At first I thought it was some joke of genetic engineering until I saw a puncture site at the lower segment of the spike with dark blue dye that stained my thumb readily.
    I turned away right away not able to comprehend how this type of scam is tolerated or it being labeled the first blue in the world.

  37. Saw them at Home Depot today and thought they looked very unnatural but intriguing. Almost something out of Avatar I just wished they would glow in the dark. At first I thought it was some joke of genetic engineering until I saw a puncture site at the lower segment of the spike with dark blue dye that stained my thumb readily.
    I turned away right away not able to comprehend how this type of scam is tolerated or it being labeled the first blue in the world.

  38. I bought one at a local home and garden store because the bright blue caught my eye. It does look dyed, but time will tell. The plant seems hardy and healthy and I will enjoy it, and all my orchids. I like pretty colors in all things, and I’m enjoying it.

  39. I too just bought one today from home depot and don’t care that it turned out to be “fake”. It is still a real, healthy orchid . We have had such a looong winter, in fact it snowed again this morning! I loved the look and intensity of the thing and figured over time the new flowers would fade and I would add aluminum sulfate as they do with the blue hydrangeas but alas, it has been injected into the stem with something to make it this blue. Oh well, I’ll enjoy the blue blooms while they last. Oh! And I have real boobs as well! Yeahoo, love that blue!!

  40. I just got this orchid for Mother’s Day from my son, and I think it is just gorgeous! I love it, it takes my breath away it is so beautiful. I’ll be the first to admit I’m not an expert on orchids, this is my first. But I love it. It is stunningly beautiful.

    I will ask this; how many of you women, (or men, for that matter) have naturally colored hair? Or naturally white teeth? Think about it.

    Get over it!! They are beautiful.

    Tianca

  41. Yes, your chemically engineered orchids do look lovely. It's a little disappointing though when new blooms are not also blue. But then white is pretty too. Cheers!

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