Disease Costs Bonnie Plants $1M In Recall

An Alabama wholesaler linked to a destructive tomato blight that turned up in Northeastern big box retail stores has pulled its plants from New York and five other states, the Times Union in Albany, N.Y. reports.

Company officials at Bonnie Plants, however, harbor doubts that the disease, known as late blight, originated in its greenhouses, which extend into 38 states, company General Manager Dennis Thomas says.

Pulling plants out of Home Depot, Lowe’s and Walmart stores in New York, New Hampshire, Maine, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts since news of the blight broke last week has probably cost the company $1 million in lost sales, Thomas said.

In New York, diseased tomato seedlings were found for sale in a Scotia retailer, according to Cornell Cooperative Extension, with reports also coming in from Tompkins County, Plattsburgh and Malone.

"We are not irresponsible," said Thomas, of the 91-year-old company, which has 62 greenhouse complexes. Inspections by state officials of company greenhouses in Pennsylvania and New Jersey found no evidence of the blight, according to records provided.

Bonnie Plants did not knowingly ship any infected tomato plants, and it questioned whether the blight may have occurred after plants arrived at Northeast retailers, Thomas said. The company shipped most of its tomatoes to the region during April and May, he said.

Cornell University had linked the blight to shipments from a company greenhouse in Georgia. That greenhouse uses organic methods, which do not include the pesticides that can keep blight at bay, says Thomas. He said "less than 1 percent" of the company’s tomato shipments this spring came from that greenhouse.

Thomas says the company expects to have its plants reappear on store shelves in the Northeast by the end of the month, when it will ship herbs and cold-weather plants.

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88 comments on “Disease Costs Bonnie Plants $1M In Recall

  1. We have had the positvie experience of producing thousands of certified organic plants without disease. More than likely the credit can be attributed to vermicompost used in our mixes. Why is it Cornell University, in this case and other Universities seem to insinuate that toxic pesticides must be included in the mixes to prevent plant disease?

  2. You can control plant disease more effectively with a combination of good growing practices and yes, some chemical applications, at the right time in the right amount. I suspect the more “positive experience” organics proliferate, the more of these situations we will see. In the end, the consumer will decide with their purchases which is preferred. I believe Bonnie Plants did nothing wrong.

  3. I have bought Bonnie Plants for years and I spray them as I do all other plants I buy. This year , ”knock on wood” I have had no problems with any of my tomatoes but there is no doubt it is because of the spraying I always do……I will continue to buy Bonnie Plants as well as others as I always have. I love my homegrown tomatoes….

  4. I think it’s interesting that the georgia facility is suspected, but apparently nobody has checked it yet. Even more interesting is that I believe that these plants are represented as locally grown, but are actually shipped over 800 miles! Not exactly my idea of local.

  5. I use Bonnie Plants every year in my garden. I once lived close to one of their greenhouses in MD. They do ship in plants during their busy season to keep up with the demand. But only a small percentage is shipped the majority is grown locally. As far as that Georgia location who knows. I live in PA now and my garden is doing great but still spray to keep the blight at bay.

  6. I have been selling products to Bonnie for 15 years and you talk about someone doing their due diligence. The products you put in their facility better be above standard or you won’t be in there long. Dennis Thomas is one of the most detailed persons I have ever known.

  7. Do any of these anonymous posts seem staged?

    Sounds like it to me.
    How do people that appear to be end consumers and say that they bought some of Bonnie plants find this grower specific publication to express their support for Bonnie Plants?

  8. I spoke earlier under an anonymous name speaking of how I lived near a MD location. You ask how consumers found this grower specific publication its called GOOGLE. Thank you,

  9. I’ve been growing tomatoes for over 40 years. I never saw late blight before. I planted about 80 plants this year- all started from seed- mostly hierlooms.A few weeks ago I bought a tomato plant for the container on my deck from Home Depot. It immediately got late blight symptoms and died and I pulled it out and tossed it. Then I learned about the seriousness of late blight and checked my other plants. Several appeared diseased and I pulled them (they had been big beautiful plants till then.) I sent a sample to Penn States Buckhout lab for analysis. They called me today and confirmed late blight. Last week I stopped in at the home depot where I got the bad plant – West Norriton in SE PA and tried to warn the woman who runs the plant department ,expecting her to appreciate the heads up. She did not. (Her actual response: “So what do you want from me?” in a very irritated tone).
    So all I can think of now, as the last of my tomato plants wither away, is “WHAT DID THEY KNOW, AND WHEN DID THEY KNOW IT”

  10. when Bonnie Plants stocks one of the box stores it removes the plants that don’t look well by placing them in the truck. if these plants are infected, even if from plants from a different vendor the healthy plants inside the truck have now been exposed to the disease. so it is very possible that the beautiful plants (and i do mean beautiful) that are still on the truck and going to the next box store have now been infected and within 3 days symptoms will show up. i suggest that instead of removing the old plants and infecting their trucks and healthy plants, Bonnie Plants should make a deal with the box stores to bag up the bad plants and dispose of them at these sites. i have seen the Bonnie Plants people as they work and they are to be commended for their work ethics, however prudent sanitary practices are necessary to prevent this from happening again.

  11. Shame on Bonnie for a half ass attempt at representing organic products and practices and then not owning up to their mistakes and immediately cleaning up the stores properly. All that profit went into their pockets instead of into R&D and implementation. Result is a black eye for the stores that carry the product and a black eye for the industry. Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me.

  12. With a period of several days between infection and symptom development, late blight is not a disease that can be managed by roguing out plants showing distinctive symptoms, particularly in densely planted greenhouses or stocked trucks. In such situations, several times as many plants will be presymptomatic as symptomatic. While the symptomless phase may be just a few days, it can be much longer, making short quarantines impractical. Pulling infected plants is no solution (particularly if you put them back with healthy ones). With that approach to disease management, it was a near certainty that the strain of late blight currently widespread in the Southeast (US-14 or US-17) would be spread to the Northeast, where US-8 is typical. Another common thread in this situation was a total lack of recognition and undestanding of the problem at the retail level and probably at the regional greenhouses Bonnie subcontracted. That’s where being “proactive” would help.

  13. I bought my plant very early at Walmart…in fact it was still on the multi level push cart that came off the truck wrapped in cellophane. I think I bought the very first plant at my area store….must have been late march or early april.

    It’s thriving! 6 ft tall and TONS of tiny tomatoes all over it. Its a balcony container tomato plant…my only one. It’s a Bonnie plant… I’ve always gotten a late start when it comes to getting a tomato plant…this year I made sure I started early. Im glad I did.

  14. After reviewing the blight issue with Bonnie I have come to the conclusion that blight is not only conditional but geographical……..It seems that the vast majority is in the N.E. which experianced extreem wet conditions this spring and sub-normal temperatures which all add up to blight.
    I would like to see the data on other plant companies to see if any blight appeared

  15. Your diseased plants ruined my garden.
    I will never buy another “Bonnie” product as long as I garden.

    I plant my own seed sets from now on and foget the “instant” garden.

  16. For the 1st time in 30+ years of gardening, I have just pulled ALL of my tomato plants due to disease which tuned out to be late blight. The blight was confirmed by the U of Md extension service. Half of my plants were grown from seed plus some heirlooms from a local source, the others were from Bonnie. Fortunately, there is still time for a late season crop assuming that plants can be found. I will never buy a Bonnie product again.

  17. This is to all of you commenting that you’ll never buy Bonnie again– Bonnie did not ship any plants from Georgia to the northeast. They have 61 growing stations that serve the nation. Their plants are grown and trucked LOCALLY to big box. SO you are mistaken. Bonnie was not responsible for blight- they did not provide the weather nor the pathogen- only the host for the disease to occur. Further, Cornell mentioned early on that the first incidence of late blight in the NE was in a commercial potato field and on tomato plants in a home garden. The disease did not show up at retail till AFTER it was discovered in the potato field. I think Bonnie stepped up big time- they mist have lost millions pulling plants from retail-even if they didn’t show signs of the disease- but you don’t hear them complaining about lost profits. You can’t control Mother Nature- and if you are a gardener you know that plant disease exist.

  18. Yes, mother nature can be very powerful. The most amazing thing I have seen her pull off in all my half century of observing is blowing those spores simultaneously into all those home depot and lowes stores where they infected all those poor innocent bonnie plants. Speaking of bonnie plants, Mr. Anonymous, you have a lot of knowledge about their company. Would it be a huge stretch for me to guess that maybe that is who signs your paycheck?

  19. Re: Anonymous Jul 24: Bonnie’s tomatoes are started in the South and shipped as seedlings to the regional greenhouses for further growth and distribution. They are not “local”. This is an effective distribution system for the distributing pathogen as well. What may or may not have happened at one store on Long Island doesn’t discount everything else that occurred in the northeast. In Maine, blight was found on Bonnie tomatoes in stores uniformly across the state before any blight was found elsewhere (and we look pretty hard for it). Most of the plants I’m aware of were removed by the store’s personnel and not by Bonnie as a “precaution” They were illegal to sell at that point.

  20. I live in Pittsburgh PA and bought several varieties of Tomato Plants from Home Depot- all were Bonnie Plants…. All of these started to look bad 1.5 weeks ago- with wilting leaves. My HUGE still green tomatoes then started to get nasty brown spots on them. I did not know what this was at the time, so I did not destroy them. EVERY SINGLE tomato plant from “Bonnie” was affected. (I know this because I save the little ID tags that come with each plant- and I insert them infront of each plant). Funny- all the “Bonnie” plants were bad.

    I did some research- and found out about this blight. It is too late for me now– unfortunately, the Bonnie plants spread this disease to my other tomato plants that were purchased at a local greenhouse. One week after the initial outbreak on the Bonnie plants, the tomatoes purchased at the local greenhouse are now starting to be affected.

    This disease is nasty- and it will wipe out your tomatoes in a short period of time. I will never purchase another Bonnie plant again. I NEVER have had this problem in 10 years of gardening.

    I called Home Depot to complain- and waited on hold for 20 minutes to speak to a supervisor. My kids were screaming for me- so I had to hang up… GRRRRR. I plan on making a trip to the Depot to complain in person.

    I have PROOF that this started with the Bonnie plants— all the Bonnie varieties were the first affected. The plants from the local Greenhouse looked great last week as the Bonnie plants died. Now- as mentioned above- this disease spread to my healthy plants as well.

    I am totally disgusted- all the work, time and money that I put into my garden has been for nothing!

  21. Blight is something originated from wet damp moist environments,also found most commonly upon potatoes! It had nothing to do with bonnie plants! Other vendors like bell nursery, metrolina, and many others had veggie plants in some stores and they had the blight as well! I was in new jersey myself for 4 months and in june alone, it rained almost 18 days straight! People bonnie plants are the best quality plants you can find if your wanting to plant a veggie, herb or flower garden!

  22. shame on all of you who purchased (and purchase) your plants at big box stores. Why not support the independent nurseries?? Small business is what this country in based on. At the very least you would have someone to accept resposibility>

  23. Im sick and tired of all these ignorant people rambling on about how thier done with bonnie and bonnie ruined my garden! Any real gardener knows that its not an easy task keeping all of your plants disease free and bug free no matter where you are! But you have to give your garden the attention you give your children, if they’re feeling sick, you give them medicine! Same with your plants! And just to touch base on the locally grown issue……bonnie plants are all locally grown and delivered to your store fresh! And for some of you complaining about profit…..bonnie plants is the only company devoting thereself to going greener in every aspect of the buisness! Bonnie also gave free cabbage plants to 1.2 million third graders through thier third grade cabbage program,and also had a church program where they gave out free plants as well! You give me the name of any, and i mean any other company thats doing this?????????? Thats because there is no other companys doing this! So maybe this will set all of you who have something bad to say back in your seat! Your lack of intelligence and know how in gardening really shows! In the North East region where most of the mess and rumors started there were extreme weather conditions that took part in this late blight issue for every plant distributor! In the North East they found potatoe farms full of the late blight, and not just on bonnie plants but on all of the other distributors veggie plants as well! This disease can fly airborn from one garden to another, and from one rack of plants in a store to the one sitting right next to it! This disease did not come from bonnie plants…..and for those of you who think different, when your next planting season comes around, check out the bonnie plants and see for yourself!

  24. I have a self contained greenhouse. I was hospitalized so couldn’t get my seeds started on time. Thought I’d put 1/2 a dozen Bonnie plants in there for some early tomatos. The blight wiped out my whole crop so you can’t tell me it wasn’t Bonnie Plants….I know better.

  25. First of all, I think that the only reason Bonnie Plant is being blamed is because they are a large company and they did step up and remove plants from the stores to prevent further spread. I haven’t heard any mention of the smaller companies taking any responsibility when it could have been them that started it. I read up on blight last summer and found that it can spread from neighbor to neighbor as well. So, it’s just plain ignorant to go placing blame. Oh and by the way, where I live, you can buy Bonnie plants from the local nursery’s as well. I plant Bonnie plants and I’m proud of it! Last year I had so many tomatoes that I had to give alot away, the same with squash. My herbs are always so full and healthy looking and even the flowers are awesome. My whole yard was nothing but a Bonnie Garden. I even asked the Bonnie salesman once where the plants came from and he explained that some are grown locally and when there is a high demand, they come from other places. Well, how come the only places that are complaining about the Blight is confined to a small section of the US when Bonnie delivers accross the whole US?

  26. Is this why I can’t find the multi packs of tomatoes this year. I usually plant a bunch of Bonnie tomato plants but they only have the single plants for $3.50 a piece. Thats $63 for 18 plants….no thank you. Is this so they can recoop their loses from last years North East recall?

  27. I had bouth some plants that came from bonnie plants they turn yellow and die so i went and bouth some more and they are doing the same thing what is going wrong here please let me know something i have tired of buying plants that dies

  28. oooooh an Shawny just wait until you buy a lots of plants from bonnies and they are no good and wont make them good then come back and tell us the same as you are now ….i dont think you will be saying the same thing then !!!!

  29. I have bought Bonnie farms plant for many years and am so frustrated that every year it is a total waste as far as Tomatoe Production, early blight has prompted me to remove all plants every single year. This year found a local grower, who had a much larger selection, healthier plants, and at half the price. And so far no sign’s of blight. I will continue supporting my local grower whenever possible.

  30. Okay, it it now August 6 of 2010. My tomatoes have the late blight which I have never had before. I am doing my internet research now…… I planted Bonnie plants for the first time this year and they are dieing. Most of these posts are 2009…..Are any people having problems in 2010 besides me too??

  31. Squash bugs seem to be a new issue with bonnies plants this year – Us and a friend of ours both bought Bonnies plants at Home Depot from Atlanta – My friend had hers delivered in NY – We both ended up with the same problems – squash bugs – All of the squash related plants started great then all of the squashes and surrounding plants had to be removed and the bugs exterminated – and yes the blight is effecting 40 tomatoe plants too – they are being removed now and destroyed – From now on it will be plant from seed and stay away from anything that Bonnies puts out – yes they may be a big company but that is not the reason they are to blame – it is negligence on their part!

  32. i went to home depot early in the season and purchased tomato plants, squash,zucchini, cucumbers, beans, all from Bonnie, my squash and zuchinni were doing great, then all of a sudden, the plant’s leaves died and the entire plant went almost disappeared, the zucchini is also about to go, the roots of the plants are very sick looking, my tomato plants are not doing as well as my neighbors, which tells me something about my plants, they are diseased, ansd it is not the soil, now i will say my sweet basil is doing wonderful, my real complaint is the squash, and i intend to go to home depot and file a legal complaint with the attorney general’s office, think of it this way, bonnie ships to home depot all across the country, my friends in Atlanta have experienced the same prolem bought from Home Depot/Bonnies now you can’t convince me otherwise that the plants were not bugged when shipped, not a good scene, when i live in Buffalo, New York a distance of 1,000 miles and the same problem is prevalent on each of our plants. I will not go to home depot/Bonnies next year, will go to a local grower/nursery, like my neighbor did

  33. Well, I’m back and had another successfull year with Bonnie Plants in my garden. I had so mant cucumbers that I canned about 6 bushels full! I also took so much squash and cucumbers and peppers to the farmers market that we ended up making over $200.00! Tomatoes gor big and beautiful but stayed green, found out alot of people were having the same problem, and they had planted from seed, so it wasn’t a “Bonnie” issue. I wish I could post pics on here, because my garden was awesome! I’m already gearing up for this year!
    I’m sorry some of you had such bad luck. I will say that I do know that when you buy already grown plants from any place, it is a risk. I mean, HD and Walmart get plants shipped in from other states and they are all in the same area and therefor are all exposed to the same air. It’s easy to blame the biggest seller at those stores, but we really don’t know if it’s Bonnies fault or maybe it was spread from another grower and unseen. By the way, I used to plant everything from seed. Now with 6 kids, I just get the full plants already growing and plant my heart out!

  34. We have had the positvie experience of producing thousands of certified organic plants without disease. More than likely the credit can be attributed to vermicompost used in our mixes. Why is it Cornell University, in this case and other Universities seem to insinuate that toxic pesticides must be included in the mixes to prevent plant disease?

  35. You can control plant disease more effectively with a combination of good growing practices and yes, some chemical applications, at the right time in the right amount. I suspect the more “positive experience” organics proliferate, the more of these situations we will see. In the end, the consumer will decide with their purchases which is preferred. I believe Bonnie Plants did nothing wrong.

  36. I have bought Bonnie Plants for years and I spray them as I do all other plants I buy. This year , ”knock on wood” I have had no problems with any of my tomatoes but there is no doubt it is because of the spraying I always do……I will continue to buy Bonnie Plants as well as others as I always have. I love my homegrown tomatoes….

  37. I think it’s interesting that the georgia facility is suspected, but apparently nobody has checked it yet. Even more interesting is that I believe that these plants are represented as locally grown, but are actually shipped over 800 miles! Not exactly my idea of local.

  38. I use Bonnie Plants every year in my garden. I once lived close to one of their greenhouses in MD. They do ship in plants during their busy season to keep up with the demand. But only a small percentage is shipped the majority is grown locally. As far as that Georgia location who knows. I live in PA now and my garden is doing great but still spray to keep the blight at bay.

  39. I have been selling products to Bonnie for 15 years and you talk about someone doing their due diligence. The products you put in their facility better be above standard or you won’t be in there long. Dennis Thomas is one of the most detailed persons I have ever known.

  40. Do any of these anonymous posts seem staged?

    Sounds like it to me.
    How do people that appear to be end consumers and say that they bought some of Bonnie plants find this grower specific publication to express their support for Bonnie Plants?

  41. I spoke earlier under an anonymous name speaking of how I lived near a MD location. You ask how consumers found this grower specific publication its called GOOGLE. Thank you,

  42. I’ve been growing tomatoes for over 40 years. I never saw late blight before. I planted about 80 plants this year- all started from seed- mostly hierlooms.A few weeks ago I bought a tomato plant for the container on my deck from Home Depot. It immediately got late blight symptoms and died and I pulled it out and tossed it. Then I learned about the seriousness of late blight and checked my other plants. Several appeared diseased and I pulled them (they had been big beautiful plants till then.) I sent a sample to Penn States Buckhout lab for analysis. They called me today and confirmed late blight. Last week I stopped in at the home depot where I got the bad plant – West Norriton in SE PA and tried to warn the woman who runs the plant department ,expecting her to appreciate the heads up. She did not. (Her actual response: “So what do you want from me?” in a very irritated tone).
    So all I can think of now, as the last of my tomato plants wither away, is “WHAT DID THEY KNOW, AND WHEN DID THEY KNOW IT”

  43. when Bonnie Plants stocks one of the box stores it removes the plants that don’t look well by placing them in the truck. if these plants are infected, even if from plants from a different vendor the healthy plants inside the truck have now been exposed to the disease. so it is very possible that the beautiful plants (and i do mean beautiful) that are still on the truck and going to the next box store have now been infected and within 3 days symptoms will show up. i suggest that instead of removing the old plants and infecting their trucks and healthy plants, Bonnie Plants should make a deal with the box stores to bag up the bad plants and dispose of them at these sites. i have seen the Bonnie Plants people as they work and they are to be commended for their work ethics, however prudent sanitary practices are necessary to prevent this from happening again.

  44. Shame on Bonnie for a half ass attempt at representing organic products and practices and then not owning up to their mistakes and immediately cleaning up the stores properly. All that profit went into their pockets instead of into R&D and implementation. Result is a black eye for the stores that carry the product and a black eye for the industry. Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me.

  45. With a period of several days between infection and symptom development, late blight is not a disease that can be managed by roguing out plants showing distinctive symptoms, particularly in densely planted greenhouses or stocked trucks. In such situations, several times as many plants will be presymptomatic as symptomatic. While the symptomless phase may be just a few days, it can be much longer, making short quarantines impractical. Pulling infected plants is no solution (particularly if you put them back with healthy ones). With that approach to disease management, it was a near certainty that the strain of late blight currently widespread in the Southeast (US-14 or US-17) would be spread to the Northeast, where US-8 is typical. Another common thread in this situation was a total lack of recognition and undestanding of the problem at the retail level and probably at the regional greenhouses Bonnie subcontracted. That’s where being “proactive” would help.

  46. I bought my plant very early at Walmart…in fact it was still on the multi level push cart that came off the truck wrapped in cellophane. I think I bought the very first plant at my area store….must have been late march or early april.

    It’s thriving! 6 ft tall and TONS of tiny tomatoes all over it. Its a balcony container tomato plant…my only one. It’s a Bonnie plant… I’ve always gotten a late start when it comes to getting a tomato plant…this year I made sure I started early. Im glad I did.

  47. After reviewing the blight issue with Bonnie I have come to the conclusion that blight is not only conditional but geographical……..It seems that the vast majority is in the N.E. which experianced extreem wet conditions this spring and sub-normal temperatures which all add up to blight.
    I would like to see the data on other plant companies to see if any blight appeared

  48. Your diseased plants ruined my garden.
    I will never buy another “Bonnie” product as long as I garden.

    I plant my own seed sets from now on and foget the “instant” garden.

  49. For the 1st time in 30+ years of gardening, I have just pulled ALL of my tomato plants due to disease which tuned out to be late blight. The blight was confirmed by the U of Md extension service. Half of my plants were grown from seed plus some heirlooms from a local source, the others were from Bonnie. Fortunately, there is still time for a late season crop assuming that plants can be found. I will never buy a Bonnie product again.

  50. This is to all of you commenting that you’ll never buy Bonnie again– Bonnie did not ship any plants from Georgia to the northeast. They have 61 growing stations that serve the nation. Their plants are grown and trucked LOCALLY to big box. SO you are mistaken. Bonnie was not responsible for blight- they did not provide the weather nor the pathogen- only the host for the disease to occur. Further, Cornell mentioned early on that the first incidence of late blight in the NE was in a commercial potato field and on tomato plants in a home garden. The disease did not show up at retail till AFTER it was discovered in the potato field. I think Bonnie stepped up big time- they mist have lost millions pulling plants from retail-even if they didn’t show signs of the disease- but you don’t hear them complaining about lost profits. You can’t control Mother Nature- and if you are a gardener you know that plant disease exist.

  51. Yes, mother nature can be very powerful. The most amazing thing I have seen her pull off in all my half century of observing is blowing those spores simultaneously into all those home depot and lowes stores where they infected all those poor innocent bonnie plants. Speaking of bonnie plants, Mr. Anonymous, you have a lot of knowledge about their company. Would it be a huge stretch for me to guess that maybe that is who signs your paycheck?

  52. Re: Anonymous Jul 24: Bonnie’s tomatoes are started in the South and shipped as seedlings to the regional greenhouses for further growth and distribution. They are not “local”. This is an effective distribution system for the distributing pathogen as well. What may or may not have happened at one store on Long Island doesn’t discount everything else that occurred in the northeast. In Maine, blight was found on Bonnie tomatoes in stores uniformly across the state before any blight was found elsewhere (and we look pretty hard for it). Most of the plants I’m aware of were removed by the store’s personnel and not by Bonnie as a “precaution” They were illegal to sell at that point.

  53. I live in Pittsburgh PA and bought several varieties of Tomato Plants from Home Depot- all were Bonnie Plants…. All of these started to look bad 1.5 weeks ago- with wilting leaves. My HUGE still green tomatoes then started to get nasty brown spots on them. I did not know what this was at the time, so I did not destroy them. EVERY SINGLE tomato plant from “Bonnie” was affected. (I know this because I save the little ID tags that come with each plant- and I insert them infront of each plant). Funny- all the “Bonnie” plants were bad.

    I did some research- and found out about this blight. It is too late for me now– unfortunately, the Bonnie plants spread this disease to my other tomato plants that were purchased at a local greenhouse. One week after the initial outbreak on the Bonnie plants, the tomatoes purchased at the local greenhouse are now starting to be affected.

    This disease is nasty- and it will wipe out your tomatoes in a short period of time. I will never purchase another Bonnie plant again. I NEVER have had this problem in 10 years of gardening.

    I called Home Depot to complain- and waited on hold for 20 minutes to speak to a supervisor. My kids were screaming for me- so I had to hang up… GRRRRR. I plan on making a trip to the Depot to complain in person.

    I have PROOF that this started with the Bonnie plants— all the Bonnie varieties were the first affected. The plants from the local Greenhouse looked great last week as the Bonnie plants died. Now- as mentioned above- this disease spread to my healthy plants as well.

    I am totally disgusted- all the work, time and money that I put into my garden has been for nothing!

  54. After all plants are removed from the garden, do I treat the soil in a special way for winter. Is the blight in the soil too?

  55. Blight is something originated from wet damp moist environments,also found most commonly upon potatoes! It had nothing to do with bonnie plants! Other vendors like bell nursery, metrolina, and many others had veggie plants in some stores and they had the blight as well! I was in new jersey myself for 4 months and in june alone, it rained almost 18 days straight! People bonnie plants are the best quality plants you can find if your wanting to plant a veggie, herb or flower garden!

  56. shame on all of you who purchased (and purchase) your plants at big box stores. Why not support the independent nurseries?? Small business is what this country in based on. At the very least you would have someone to accept resposibility>

  57. Im sick and tired of all these ignorant people rambling on about how thier done with bonnie and bonnie ruined my garden! Any real gardener knows that its not an easy task keeping all of your plants disease free and bug free no matter where you are! But you have to give your garden the attention you give your children, if they’re feeling sick, you give them medicine! Same with your plants! And just to touch base on the locally grown issue……bonnie plants are all locally grown and delivered to your store fresh! And for some of you complaining about profit…..bonnie plants is the only company devoting thereself to going greener in every aspect of the buisness! Bonnie also gave free cabbage plants to 1.2 million third graders through thier third grade cabbage program,and also had a church program where they gave out free plants as well! You give me the name of any, and i mean any other company thats doing this?????????? Thats because there is no other companys doing this! So maybe this will set all of you who have something bad to say back in your seat! Your lack of intelligence and know how in gardening really shows! In the North East region where most of the mess and rumors started there were extreme weather conditions that took part in this late blight issue for every plant distributor! In the North East they found potatoe farms full of the late blight, and not just on bonnie plants but on all of the other distributors veggie plants as well! This disease can fly airborn from one garden to another, and from one rack of plants in a store to the one sitting right next to it! This disease did not come from bonnie plants…..and for those of you who think different, when your next planting season comes around, check out the bonnie plants and see for yourself!

  58. I have a self contained greenhouse. I was hospitalized so couldn’t get my seeds started on time. Thought I’d put 1/2 a dozen Bonnie plants in there for some early tomatos. The blight wiped out my whole crop so you can’t tell me it wasn’t Bonnie Plants….I know better.

  59. First of all, I think that the only reason Bonnie Plant is being blamed is because they are a large company and they did step up and remove plants from the stores to prevent further spread. I haven’t heard any mention of the smaller companies taking any responsibility when it could have been them that started it. I read up on blight last summer and found that it can spread from neighbor to neighbor as well. So, it’s just plain ignorant to go placing blame. Oh and by the way, where I live, you can buy Bonnie plants from the local nursery’s as well. I plant Bonnie plants and I’m proud of it! Last year I had so many tomatoes that I had to give alot away, the same with squash. My herbs are always so full and healthy looking and even the flowers are awesome. My whole yard was nothing but a Bonnie Garden. I even asked the Bonnie salesman once where the plants came from and he explained that some are grown locally and when there is a high demand, they come from other places. Well, how come the only places that are complaining about the Blight is confined to a small section of the US when Bonnie delivers accross the whole US?

  60. Is this why I can’t find the multi packs of tomatoes this year. I usually plant a bunch of Bonnie tomato plants but they only have the single plants for $3.50 a piece. Thats $63 for 18 plants….no thank you. Is this so they can recoop their loses from last years North East recall?

  61. I had bouth some plants that came from bonnie plants they turn yellow and die so i went and bouth some more and they are doing the same thing what is going wrong here please let me know something i have tired of buying plants that dies

  62. oooooh an Shawny just wait until you buy a lots of plants from bonnies and they are no good and wont make them good then come back and tell us the same as you are now ….i dont think you will be saying the same thing then !!!!

  63. I have bought Bonnie farms plant for many years and am so frustrated that every year it is a total waste as far as Tomatoe Production, early blight has prompted me to remove all plants every single year. This year found a local grower, who had a much larger selection, healthier plants, and at half the price. And so far no sign’s of blight. I will continue supporting my local grower whenever possible.

  64. Okay, it it now August 6 of 2010. My tomatoes have the late blight which I have never had before. I am doing my internet research now…… I planted Bonnie plants for the first time this year and they are dieing. Most of these posts are 2009…..Are any people having problems in 2010 besides me too??

  65. Squash bugs seem to be a new issue with bonnies plants this year – Us and a friend of ours both bought Bonnies plants at Home Depot from Atlanta – My friend had hers delivered in NY – We both ended up with the same problems – squash bugs – All of the squash related plants started great then all of the squashes and surrounding plants had to be removed and the bugs exterminated – and yes the blight is effecting 40 tomatoe plants too – they are being removed now and destroyed – From now on it will be plant from seed and stay away from anything that Bonnies puts out – yes they may be a big company but that is not the reason they are to blame – it is negligence on their part!

  66. i went to home depot early in the season and purchased tomato plants, squash,zucchini, cucumbers, beans, all from Bonnie, my squash and zuchinni were doing great, then all of a sudden, the plant’s leaves died and the entire plant went almost disappeared, the zucchini is also about to go, the roots of the plants are very sick looking, my tomato plants are not doing as well as my neighbors, which tells me something about my plants, they are diseased, ansd it is not the soil, now i will say my sweet basil is doing wonderful, my real complaint is the squash, and i intend to go to home depot and file a legal complaint with the attorney general’s office, think of it this way, bonnie ships to home depot all across the country, my friends in Atlanta have experienced the same prolem bought from Home Depot/Bonnies now you can’t convince me otherwise that the plants were not bugged when shipped, not a good scene, when i live in Buffalo, New York a distance of 1,000 miles and the same problem is prevalent on each of our plants. I will not go to home depot/Bonnies next year, will go to a local grower/nursery, like my neighbor did

  67. Well, I’m back and had another successfull year with Bonnie Plants in my garden. I had so mant cucumbers that I canned about 6 bushels full! I also took so much squash and cucumbers and peppers to the farmers market that we ended up making over $200.00! Tomatoes gor big and beautiful but stayed green, found out alot of people were having the same problem, and they had planted from seed, so it wasn’t a “Bonnie” issue. I wish I could post pics on here, because my garden was awesome! I’m already gearing up for this year!
    I’m sorry some of you had such bad luck. I will say that I do know that when you buy already grown plants from any place, it is a risk. I mean, HD and Walmart get plants shipped in from other states and they are all in the same area and therefor are all exposed to the same air. It’s easy to blame the biggest seller at those stores, but we really don’t know if it’s Bonnies fault or maybe it was spread from another grower and unseen. By the way, I used to plant everything from seed. Now with 6 kids, I just get the full plants already growing and plant my heart out!

  68. I purchased 64 Bonnie tomato plants from Lowe's(Mt.Dora,FL) on March 3, and planted them that day. Within a week, the buds started wilting… then, the plants started losing their leaves. In two weeks, 48 of the plants were almost dead……. I waited a week and replanted and those plants (from Bonnie) are okay but gowing very slowly! How do I file a claim?

  69. Bought a smallish Basil plant at local Wal-Mart (Alb.NM) and after two weeks more than half the leaves were splotched with black. Are the remaining green leaves safe to eat? Local BigBox nursery departments aren't well cared for but my husband wanted to surprise me. Daughter had bought some good basil and cherry tomato plants there early in the summer. Any ideas? Phyllis.

  70. I bought a bunch of tomatoe cukes, pumkin, zukes, and some other plants from lowes, so far all but one of the cukes have died, they look like they were sprayed with something that made the leaves turn blotchy and get dry even tho the soil was moist. I no longer have the receipt, but I do have the containers and the tags for each. I have always bought the bonnies because I have such good luck with them and I always bring them indoors until it is safe outside to plant them as I am higher up than most.

  71. I'd like to know if Bonnie tomato plants were grown from Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO). Does anyone know for sure? And this is 2013. These posts are really old!

  72. septoria is routinely found on bonnie tomato transplants–beware–devastating tomato disease–called them -no response.

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