Delray Plants Founder Dies

Delray Plants Founder Dies

Delray Plants Founder Dies

Jacob Koornneef, founder of Delray Plants in Florida, died Sunday morning. He was 80.

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Koornneef founded Delray Plants on 14 acres in Delray Beach in 1968. Since then, Delray Plants has expanded to four locations in Florida and two sites in Costa Rica, making it one of the largest indoor foliage production and shipping facilities in the United States.

Delray Plants is so large, in fact, that it’s ranked No. 13 on Greenhouse Grower’s Top 100 Growers list. Last year, Delray Plants reported it has 3.86 million square feet of environmentally controlled greenhouse space.

Delray Plants, on Jacob’s behalf, asks that you consider making a donation to the Friends of Ashish, P.O. Box 551, Palos Heights, IL 60463. Reference “Geeta Mondol” when you make a donation, as this will continue support for a Christian-based school for autistic children in India that Jacob helped found.

For more information or to leave a message for the family, visit DelrayPlants.com/jakek.php.

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Anonymous says:

Having only worked for Delray Plants for a year and a half, I didn’t get to know “Jake” as well as those that have known him for years.

But in these few months, it became very evident how important this man was to the foliage industry.

The first thing many people mentioned was his 6 day a week and daylight to dark work ethic. Another important area that I picked up on was his attention to making sure that his customers were getting a quality product. He seemed to always be looking for that “new” item that was going to be the next big seller.

I learned a lot from his grand daughter, Holly, also. Holly Koornneef spent a lot of time with “Opa and Oma Koornneef” and would share with me her grandfathers ideas and observations of today’s changing industry. Indeed , a lot has changed since this titan of foliage potted his first plant.

One memory I will keep forever about Jake Koornneef is this; he walks into the office, his hair perfectly combed and always dressed in dark trousers and a nice dress shirt, he is carrying a thermos and his small igloo cooler with his lunch inside. He says hello to everyone he walks past and heads to the break room where he settles in and begins his lunch while chatting with his son-in-law Randy about business. He pulls out lunch and starts eating while washing it down with a cold bottle of MacArthurs chocolate milk. In less than 15 minutes he’s finished and off to talk to Lee or Eduardo about how a croton crop is growing.

Forty plus years of giving it all he had to a business he loved.

It seems like i have known him a lifetime….

Anonymous says:

Having only worked for Delray Plants for a year and a half, I didn’t get to know “Jake” as well as those that have known him for years.

But in these few months, it became very evident how important this man was to the foliage industry.

The first thing many people mentioned was his 6 day a week and daylight to dark work ethic. Another important area that I picked up on was his attention to making sure that his customers were getting a quality product. He seemed to always be looking for that “new” item that was going to be the next big seller.

I learned a lot from his grand daughter, Holly, also. Holly Koornneef spent a lot of time with “Opa and Oma Koornneef” and would share with me her grandfathers ideas and observations of today’s changing industry. Indeed , a lot has changed since this titan of foliage potted his first plant.

One memory I will keep forever about Jake Koornneef is this; he walks into the office, his hair perfectly combed and always dressed in dark trousers and a nice dress shirt, he is carrying a thermos and his small igloo cooler with his lunch inside. He says hello to everyone he walks past and heads to the break room where he settles in and begins his lunch while chatting with his son-in-law Randy about business. He pulls out lunch and starts eating while washing it down with a cold bottle of MacArthurs chocolate milk. In less than 15 minutes he’s finished and off to talk to Lee or Eduardo about how a croton crop is growing.

Forty plus years of giving it all he had to a business he loved.

It seems like i have known him a lifetime….