Pesticide Ruling Causing Uproar

Outside our industry, the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) has asked the full Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals to review a three-judge ruling that would require permits for pesticide use even if they are applied in compliance with pesticide labeling laws.

The ruling applies to farmers, but growers should keep their eyes on the case, too.

“Farmers should not need a permit under another law when they already are following an existing law,” says AFBF President Bob Stallman. “We are disappointed that EPA (the Environmental Protection Agency) has decided not to seek a legal remedy for this situation. The decision made by the three-judge panel in January will complicate farmers’ ability to farm, and raise their expenses without improving the environment.”

A permitting program also would impose a great burden on regulatory authorities because of a staggering increase in the number of new permit requests.

For more information on the ruling, click here.

Leave a Reply

8 comments on “Pesticide Ruling Causing Uproar

  1. Anonymous

    What kind of chemicals are we talking about, danger, caution? Are their specific as to application method, maybe aerial? When we go to a link to find the rest of the story and find such a truncated, minimalist article as this, I wonder why I bother. If you are going to write it up, just pretend you work for the Washington Post or the N. Y. Times. You’ll benefit and so will the readers. Aloha, Glen

  2. Anonymous

    I agree. This sounds like it could be an important issue for our industry…more info please.

    I’m wondering if the recent focus on instant communication has taken some of the oomph out of reporting. We could certainly use WAY more depth here.

  3. Anonymous

    What kind of chemicals are we talking about, danger, caution? Are their specific as to application method, maybe aerial? When we go to a link to find the rest of the story and find such a truncated, minimalist article as this, I wonder why I bother. If you are going to write it up, just pretend you work for the Washington Post or the N. Y. Times. You’ll benefit and so will the readers. Aloha, Glen

  4. Anonymous

    I agree. This sounds like it could be an important issue for our industry…more info please.

    I’m wondering if the recent focus on instant communication has taken some of the oomph out of reporting. We could certainly use WAY more depth here.